Video: The Battle of Cable Street remembered

In 1936, over 100,000 anti-fascists barricaded the streets and fought the police in the Battle of Cable street.

September 5, 2013 · 1 min read

Around 5,000 fascists lead by Sir Oswald Mosely’s Black Shirts were prevented from marching through the East End of London by anti-fascists including Jewish and Irish East Londoners.

A new documentary investigates this historic event and reflects on lessons for today, including the context of the 2011 riots. In this clip, Siobhan and Emeka speak to Binnie Yeates, who witnessed the battle when she was five and was left deeply affected.

At the Tower Hamlets archive, oral historian Roger Mills begins to unlock the untold story of the build up to the clash and the violent attacks on the Jewish, including footage from the battle itself.

Watch more clips from the film here.

This Saturday 7 September the EDL intend to march through Tower Hamlets and the London Antifascist Network are call for as many people as possible to join the counter-demonstration to stop them.


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