The trouble with biodiversity offsetting

The fictional scenario of fracking in Regent's Park demonstrates how companies are set to gain from policy that offers them a 'licence to trash'.

July 15, 2014 · 1 min read

In theory, ‘biodiversity offsetting’ involves measuring the habitat that is likely to be affected by a proposed development, then calculating the financial compensation necessary to replicate the habitat at a new location.

In reality, as this mockumentary shows, it’s a license that can make bad developers’ dreams a reality.

Across the world offsets already justify the destruction of irreplaceable ecosystems to make way for mining projects, motorways and pipelines.

Now Europe is the new frontier; currently the European Union is considering new legislation that permits biodiversity offsets.

Tell the EU that nature is not for sale by responding to their public consultation before 17 October 2014 and sign this mass letter to the EU at naturenotforsale.org/letter2EU


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