The Spark 2015

Back for a third year, organisers of The Spark space give a taster of what can be expected at this year’s London-based social justice festival.

June 2, 2015 · 3 min read

Spark

The Spark is a week of free workshops, discussion, films, poetry, music and more taking place between 20th – 26th July 2015.

What’s on?

The Spark will host over 70 workshops on a huge range of topics. Here’s a few tasters:

· What is “Social justice” anyway?

· The journey of food: audio, textural and sensual experience of the story of food and seed from Africa and the Caribbean to the UK/Europe.

· Introduction to basic economics for social justice

· The ability in disability: questioning the idea of being healthy and being well

· Start your own band” DIY or Die: How to Start a Punk Band and Make Change

· Tell Me Your Story: make your own autobiographical zine

· Palestine 101

· Stop and Search training for young people” Y-Stop Stop and Search Training for Young People

· How to make a podcast: get your ideas across on the radio or online

· Equality and being inclusive and accessible: how to organise accessible events

… and 60 more!

The event strikes a balance between practical and creative workshops, with sessions that focus on sharing understandings, theories and information.

Find out more

What’s the ethos?

The Spark aims to bring together people from all walks of life who are struggling for social justice but might not normally meet each other. It’s a space to make new friends, share skills and understandings, and get involved more deeply with the struggle for social justice.

We know there isn’t one formula for what ‘activism’ is. At the Spark you’ll encounter a wide range of social justice work, including art, music, youth work, community organizing, peer education, direct action, workplace organizing and much more!

One of the organizing group, who came to the event as a participant last year commented

“Without a doubt it was the most significant event of the last 12 months for me. If not for the workshops one should attend the Spark for the opportunity to engage with a space which will attract many interesting, passionate, switched on people.”

How do we organise?

A group of 10-15 people meet regularly to organise The Spark, including everything from the venue, to the food, to the massive task of choosing and timetabling over 70 sessions for the week.

The idea of the event is an ambitious one, it’s a lot of work, but we’re excited about organizing a space to connect and empower people through learning, connection and expression.

See you there!!

P.s….Help needed!

We need help during the week with tasks like running the reception desk and making food, if you’re interested in helping out please get in touch.



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