Red Pepper website redesign – five highlights

You might have noticed that the Red Pepper website looks a bit different today. Our volunteers have brought it up to date for 2013

September 15, 2013 · 1 min read

Here are some of the changes:

1. Improved readability. We have changed the fonts, spacing and column widths so articles should be easier to read on-screen, especially our longer articles.

2. Better phone compatibility. The website layout now resizes automatically to the size of your phone or tablet. You’re not seeing an annoying ‘special’ mobile version”, but the site itself adapting into one column. Why not try it on your phone now?

3. Clutter-free printouts. Printing now automatically produces a page with just the text and pictures you want, with no sidebar or other menus making a mess of the page.

4. Bigger pictures. As more new articles come online, you will see that we are now able to use Red Pepper’s great photography and illustration across a greater width, so you get the full impact.

5. Social media integration. The new left-hand ‘toolbar’ lets you easily share an article with your friends on Facebook or Twitter, without having to copy-and-paste or hunt for the button.

If you appreciate these new features, why not make a donation to our fundraising appeal so we can keep making it even better?


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