People’s Agenda profile 4: Movement for Justice by Any Means Necessary

Activists fighting against immigration detention describe how they organise in this fourth profile in our People's Agenda series

April 3, 2015 · 3 min read

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peoples agenda ‘We organise inside and outside of the detention centres to bring about their end. Our members include detainees and ex-detainees, asylum seekers, refugees and migrants who stand up, speak out and organise in our communities. ‘

Movement for Justice By Any Means Necessary is an independent, integrated civil and immigrant rights organisation. We speak the truth about racism, sexism and oppression and we fight to win. We see the issue of immigrant rights as the cutting edge in all struggles for justice, economic or social.  The crisis in capitalism across the world has led more and more people to move, cross borders, seek safety or a life from poverty. Racism and immigrant bashing is a key tool used by those in power to divide and rule. That is why it must be the central fight for all those committed to social justice.

MFJ has been leading the fight nationally to see a complete end to the brutal, racist, sexist system of immigration detention. We hold public hearings putting the immigration system on trial; we demonstrate at the detention centres and in our communities, we act with “the fierce urgency of now”.

Our power and our strength lie in the great power of the oppressed mobilised in action.  We understand that moral appeals do not win, our members are fighters and leaders our methods are whatever is necessary. Join us for ‘Surround Harmondsworth 7’ on 11th April, be part of a growing, dynamic movement with a strategy to win.

To find out more: mfj@ueaa.net // www.facebook.com/movementforjustice // @followmfj

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.

Join Red Pepper for our free event on 22 April in London- Beyond the Ballot Box: Ways we can Win.


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