Creating The Future: Red Pepper magazine goes quarterly

The magazine at the heart of the movement brings you the stories that matter. Our first quarterly edition is packed full of in-depth reporting and cutting-edge analysis from around the world.

September 17, 2018 · 3 min read

The magazine at the heart of the movement has gone quarterly. We’re excited to bring you this first edition of Red Pepper 2.0, packed full of in-depth reporting and cutting-edge analysis from around the world. Forget cooked-up scandals and smear campaigns, short-lived media cycles and the agendas of oligarch-owned newspapers: we bring you the stories that matter. This issue we’ve teamed up with The World Transformed 2018, a festival looking to transform political education in this country.

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Chantal Mouffe explores the potentials and pitfalls of populism, whilst Ali Bilgic reports on the borders of Fortress Europe. Grace Blakeley writes on the de-financialisation of the economy, and Jasmine Ahmed asks what a world beyond prisons might look like. On the verge of a possible Corbyn government, Leo Panitch wonders how we position ourselves both ‘in and against’ state power. Jane Holgate thinks that the answer might begin with mass political education, and Will Stronge of Autonomy Institute looks to the transformative potential of technology.

Elsewhere we look at criminal justice, exploring the gangs matrix and the racist logic of policing tactics. Costas Lapavitsas, Hilary Wainwright and Michael Calderbank and more unpack the latest left debates over the future of Europe. Jenny Pearce asks what lessons are to be learnt from the left as the Latin America’s ‘pink tide’ seems to have receded? 

PLUS – our writers explore the future of radical football culture, and a photo essay gives us a rare glimpse into the cinemas of occupied Palestine.

All this and much more in our latest issue. Don’t miss out – get yours now.

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You can’t kill the spirit

A new book tells the story of the women who set up a pit camp to defend Houghton Main colliery against closure in 1992. It has been written by participants from Houghton and Sheffield Women Against Pit Closures: Caroline, Flis, Debbie and Marilyn

Copper mining in a climate emergency

Sebastian Ordoñez Muñoz reports on the red metal mining at the heart of a new wave of colonial expansion in Latin America

Scientists against the machine

Jane Shallice examines the history of radical research at the British Society for Social Responsibility in Science


Austerity starves our culture

Museums – and museum workers – have been hit hard by austerity policies and cuts. Clara Paillard outlines some of the key battlegrounds and considers what an alternative cultural policy might look like

Locking people up won’t help combat sexual violence

We need look beyond individual punishment to tackle a crisis which pervades the fabric of our society, argues Ann Russo

200 years from the Peterloo Massacre, we need a new movement for real democracy

Jon Narcross reflects on the legacy of the mass gathering for political representation, which was brutally shut down by the military and police.