Honduras suspends civil rights

As president Manuel Zelaya urges supporters to march, the Honduran junta ban protests and suspend other civil rights

September 28, 2009 · 2 min read

After a day of diplomatic toing and froing, ending with the threat to remove the Brazilian Embassy’s diplomatic status, if Lula di Silva’s government does not respond to the junta’s ultimatum to grant Zelaya political asylum or turn him over to the security forces in 10 days, the junta has issued a grave internal threat to dissenters.

A confused and botched “Cadena” announced the complete suspension of public assemblies not authorised by the de facto government and absolutely no tolerance of any actions that disturb the peace.

I believe a very full day of public protest was planned for today by the resistance movement and given the previous strategy of ignoring the curfews, it seems the Honduran junta is raising the pressure on the Brazilian Embassy, President Zelaya and the resistance movement.

It is difficult in these circumstances to see how clashes between the de facto government controlled security forces and the resistance movement can be avoided.

If you have followed the diplomatic moves, you will know that the de facto government has effectively barred the entry of the OAS Ambassadors, which were intended to reopen negotiations with Micheletti. Mr Micheletti has also demanded that all returning diplomatic representatives must first contact the acting foreign minister prior to arrival. This in effect is demanding recognition of the de facto government.

It is also clear that neither President Arias of Costa Rica or ex US President Jimmy Carter will be initiating any renewed negotiations nor is it probable that the Micheletti junta would accept their good offices.

So Honduras remains truly isolated. Concerted action at the United Nations and the OAS is imperative if further violence and deaths are to be prevented.


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