25 June

'This apparently inconsequential diary by a child, this "de profundis" stammered out in a child's voice, embodies all the hideousness of fascism, more so than all the evidence of Nuremberg put together.'

June 25, 2009 · 1 min read

These words of the Dutch historian, Dr Jan Romein, writing in the newspaper Het Parool in 1946, attracted the interest of Contact Publishing in Amsterdam. The company published The Annex: Diary Notes from 12 June 1942-1 August 1944 on this day in 1947. It was the first edition of Anne Frank’s diary, about the experiences of a young Jewish girl living in hiding from the Nazis, which went on to be translated into at least 50 languages and sell more than 50 million copies worldwide. Anne died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp after her family’s hiding place was discovered in 1944.


Morality tales

From cowardly men to wayward wives, pre-modern superstitions transmitted social norms as well as scares, writes Eleanor Janega

Playing on the dark side: An interview with Dawn Ray’d

Gerry Hart speaks to Simon Barr of Dawn Ray'd about black metal, its relationship with the far right and its radical potential

The global spectres of ‘Asian horror’

Bliss Cua Lim looks at how the female ghost subgenre illuminates efforts to globalise ‘Asian horror’


Rudolf Rocker: an anarchist ‘rabbi’ in London

David J. Lobina rediscovers a forgotten but fascinating figure in London’s radical and Jewish history

Review – Falling Down: The Conservative Party and the Decline of Tory Britain by Phil Burton-Cartledge

Sabrina Huck argues that a generational shift away from the Conservative Party can’t be taken for granted

The driver of dispossession

Tina Ngata explains the social and legal legacies of a 15th-century Christian principle that paved the way for imperial violence in, and far beyond, New Zealand

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