24 June

There were, according to police reports, 'grounds for considering him an anarchist', not least because this 'so-called modern painter', who was then 19, 'keeps irregular hours and sometimes even does not return at night'.

June 24, 2009 · 1 min read

The artist Pablo Picasso’s first exhibition opened in Paris on this day in 1901. His host and the organiser of the exhibition was ‘the known anarchist’ Pere Mañach, a friend of Picasso’s from Barcelona, who invited him to stay at his apartment on the Boulevard de Clichy and acted as his agent.

Picasso was kept under surveillance by the French police for 40 years. As evidence of his anarchist leanings, the 1901 police report said of him: ‘One of his recent paintings shows soldiers in foreign uniforms beating a beggar on the ground. Also in his room are several paintings representing mothers being rebuffed as they beg from the upper classes.’ In 2005, one of the paintings he made of the view from the window of his room fetched $1,696,000 in a sale at Christie’s in New York.



Higher! Further! Faster! More!

Captain Marvel is Marvel's first blockbuster with a female lead. Miriam Kent asks what we should make of it all these female superheroes taking over the big screen.

A new civilising mission

The treatment of Muslim women shows that French feminism has not shed some imperialist and racist practices, argues Malia Bouattia

It’s time to overhaul the House of Lords

When even Peers are rising up for reform, something’s in the air, writes Nancy Platts. Our movement should get behind it


Climate Striker: We must take on capitalism if we want to avert chaos

Failure is not an option, writes Zoe Rasbash

The treatment of Shamima Begum should worry us all

The government played fast and lose with fundamental rights, endangering children's lives in the process, argues Anita Hassan.

Reporting conditions for migrants are excessive and punitive

They make the Hostile Environment even more hostile, writes Mishka