19 October

After 15 years imprisonment in English jails for crimes they did not commit, the Guildford Four - Patrick Armstrong, Gerard Conlon, Paul Hill and Carole Richardson - were finally freed on 19 October 1989.

October 19, 2009 · 1 min read

The four had always maintained their innocence of the IRA pub bombings in Guildford and Woolwich in October 1974, insisting that their original confessions had been obtained by force. Their convictions were quashed by the Court of Appeal after major irregularities were uncovered in the original police evidence.

Along with the Birmingham Six and the Maguire Seven, who were also subsequently cleared of bombing offences after long terms in jail, the Guildford Four case was among the most high profile miscarriage of justices arising from the Irish ‘Troubles’. The trial judge noted in passing sentence that had capital punishment not been abolished they would have been sentenced to hang.



Workers unite online

They're logging on to combat lagging labour laws, costly court proceedings, and outsourcing management, writes Gaia Caramazza

Review – Finding a Voice: Asian women in Britain

Finding a Voice: Asian women in Britain, by Amrit Wilson, reviewed by Maya Goodfellow

The political whiteness of #MeToo

We need to confront how the movement is shaped by the power of whiteness, write Alison Phipps


Trumpism goes global

Trumpism is capitalism’s Plan B, writes Nick Dearden

Brexit’s drug problem

For all the talk of free-trade, why is ‘Global Britain’ still behind on drug law reform? By Kojo Koram

What happens if a university fails?

David Ridley reflects on the Augar Review