14 September

'We, participants in the political process in South Africa, representing the political parties and organisations and governments indicated beneath our signatures, condemn the scourge of political violence which has afflicted our country and all such practices as have contributed to such violence in the past'

September 14, 2009 · 1 min read

Today in 1991, the South African government, the African National Congress and the Inkatha Freedom Party signed the National Peace Accord, pledging to end political violence and paving the way for a transition from apartheid. It lead to the first multi-racial elections and the end of apartheid in 1994.

‘We enter into a covenant that we shall build a society in which all South Africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall, without and fear in their hearts, assured of their inalienable right to human dignity – a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world.’

Nelson Mandela



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