10 November

At 7.30am local time on 10 November 1995, Nigeria's military rulers executed the writer Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight other Ogoni activists in the southern city of Port Harcourt.

November 10, 2009 · 1 min read

The men were framed because of their opposition to the activities of oil companies such as Shell in the Ogoni homeland. The British prime minister John Major called the executions ‘judicial murder’. Shell, which had more than enough economic clout to have saved the men’s lives, failed to act on their behalf.

‘My vision of Nigeria is of a competent, well-ordered society where people care for each other and where the laws protect the weak and enhance the abilities of all citizens. Simple.’ Ken Saro-Wiwa


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