Asia

Japanese workers’ fight against karoshi, death from overwork September 2014

Scott North looks at the history of the anti-karoshi movement and its latest victory

‘The spirit of civil disobedience’ September 2014

Luke Cooper spoke to Benny Tai Yiu-ting, one of the founders of Occupy Central in Hong Kong, about the growth of the movement and the prospects for real democracy free from the influence of Beijing

Azerbaijan: The pipeline that would fuel a dictator September 2013

Emma Hughes reports from Azerbaijan, where autocratic leader Ilham Aliyev is using the country’s fossil fuel wealth to fund his repressive regime and buy Europe’s silence

India rising August 2013

In an India characterised by deep social cleavages and the forward march of globalisation, social struggles have taken many forms, writes Ashok Kumar

India: Slums, students and resistance August 2013

With 1.2 billion people, India is fast becoming one of the world’s major capitalist economies. Vijay Prashad offers some snapshots from a country where shining skyscrapers are springing up alongside ingrained mass poverty

India’s ‘rural reds’ August 2013

India’s communists were among the first in the world to be democratically elected to power. Kheya Bag looks at the history of the Communist Party of India-Marxist and the ongoing struggle for land reform

North Korea: War games gone wrong June 2013

Tim Beal examines the US ‘playbook’ miscalculations that underlie the current US-North Korea crisis

We’re striking to support the movement – interview with Turkish union activist June 2013

John Millington speaks to Ertan Elsoy, an activist in the Kesk union which has called a two day strike to support the rebellion

Istanbul: a tree grows in Gezi June 2013

Kevin Buckland reports from Istanbul on the movement so far - and what it means to people

Turkey: A people imprisoned April 2013

Once seen as a moderate party, the AKP government in Turkey is using anti-terrorism legislation to unleash a wave of repression against the left and the Kurdish movement. Tim Baster and Isabelle Merminod spoke to activists in the country

The cost of Kazakh oil December 2012

A major strike wave in the oil fields of Kazakhstan has turned into murderous repression by the Nazarbayev government. Gabriel Levy reports

Biting the rotten Apple: Taking on Foxconn August 2012

Jenny Chan talks about her campaigning with workers in China

Cycle city Kathmandu February 2012

Jennie O’Hara meets Nepali campaigners seeking to tackle pollution and inequality by transforming their capital into a cycle-friendly city

Behind the seams March 2011

Laia Blanch spoke to Amirul Haque Amin, president of the National Garment Workers Federation in Bangladesh

Make or break for Japan’s left June 2010

Japan's Prime Minister, Yukio Hatoyama has resigned after his failure to honour an election promise to move a US military base from Okinawa, Glyn Ford reports

Beating Burma’s blackout December 2009

The film Burma VJ brings Burma's struggle for freedom into close proximity to its audience and is generating new solidarity efforts as a result. Siobhan McGuirk investigates

Chemical criminals December 2009

On 3 December 1984, the world's worst industrial disaster took place at Bhopal in India. Twenty-five years on, Rajwinder Sahota visits the city to find out what happened to the victims

Unnatural no more October 2009

In July, the Delhi high court in India decriminalised homosexuality. Sylvia Rowley talks to Shaleen Rakesh, the activist who brought the case

23 June June 2009

Vietnamese photographer Nick Ut's Pullitzer prize-winning photograph of nine-year-old Kim Phuc fleeing a US napalm attack on her village appeared in Life magazine on this day in 1972. The picture had previously been rejected by some news agencies because it showed a naked girl.

Viva Siva April 2009

Now in his eighties, A Sivanandan remains an important figure in the politics of race and class, maintaining his long-held insistence that only in the symbiosis of the two struggles can a genuinely radical politics be found. By Arun Kundnani

Background to brutality April 2009

The resumption of Sri Lanka's bloody civil war following the government's unilateral abrogation of the ceasefire with the Tamil Tigers last year has seen killing and other abuses on a massive scale. Deirdre McConnell examines the background to the continuing conflict between the country's Sinhalese majority and its Tamil and other minorities

The challenges of solidarity April 2009

The urgent need in Sri Lanka is a resolution to the humanitarian crisis and strong pressure to stop government attacks on minorities, argues Ahilan Kadirgamar. But solidarity has to be pluralist, he emphasises, recognising the brutality of the Tamil Tigers and avoiding the polarisation or marginalisation of the country's diverse communities

Human rights campaigners are not terrorists January 2009

A trial is drawing to a close in which anti-terror laws are being used to prosecute innocent human rights campaigners. Peter Tatchell reports

Can’t you see the writing on the wall January 2009

With hundreds of civilians killed and a quarter of a million people trapped by the current fighting, Lonán Álvaro considers the humanitarian cost of Sri Lanka's 25-year long conflict

Pakistan amidst the storms June 2008

Graham Usher reports from Islamabad on the problems besetting Pakistan's new coalition government

Who’s afraid of the Indian Premier League? June 2008

Mike Marqusee on why it's just not cricket anymore

Pakistan after Bhutto February 2008

With 160 million people, 600,000 soldiers and 50 nuclear warheads, what happens in Pakistan after Benazir Bhutto's assassination has ramifications worldwide. Graham Usher reports from Islamabad

The Tet Offensive 40 years on February 2008

The end of January 2008 marked the 40th anniversary of an event that astonished the world, changed the course of history, and remains pregnant with lessons for today. In the early hours of 31 January 1968, soldiers of the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam and the Army of North Vietnam launched what came to be known as the Tet Offensive (it coincided with Tet Nguyen Dan, the lunar new year) against the US occupiers and their puppet government, writes Mike Marqusee

Never mind the Baluch December 2007

While Pakistan and Iran terrorise their Baluchi minorities, the British government has designated the Baluchistan Liberation Army as 'terrorist'. Ben Hayes reports

Child soldier recruiter arrested in London November 2007

Andrew Kendle reports on the arrest in London of 'Colonel' Karuna, a former Sri Lankan warlord implicated in child soldier recruitment and torture

Papuan justice denied November 2007

Indonesian human rights campaigner Peneas Lokbere talks to Kirk Ward about transmigration policy, Papuan rights and Indonesian state torture

Burma crisis September 2007

The Burmese military regime - in power since 1962 - has started to crack down on protests and resistance led by Buddhist monks. Tom Fawthrop reports from Thailand

Local fighters lead climate war August 2007

As the EU, the US and big business vie with each other to be recognised as taking serious action on climate change, Larry Lohmann wonders whether the real leadership is to be found elsewhere

The mother of modern corporatism August 2007

Karl Marx described how the East India Company 'conquered India to make money out of it'. Sixty years after the end of the Raj, Nick Robins dusts off its history and finds lessons for today in the birth of corporate globalisation

Murder in Samarkand December 2006

In 2002, while political attention was focused on Iraq and Afghanistan, a troubled British diplomat was exposing the UK's casual attitude to human rights abuses in Uzbekistan. Marcus Williams talks to Craig Murray about trying to tell the truth about torture and being branded mad by the Foreign Office

Un-free Kashmir December 2006

The earthquake opened up Pakistan-controlled Kashmir to the world. Will Islamabad close it again? Graham Usher continues his special reports from Pakistan in Muzaffarabad

Rocks and hard places December 2006

A recent attack on a madrassa in Pakistan shows up all that is wrong with Nato's and Pakistan's anti-Taliban policies, writes Graham Usher from Peshawar, in the first of two special reports from Pakistan

A new Siamese tragedy November 2006

Thailand's recent military coup - the 18th since 1932 - ousted a leader, Thaksin Shinawatra, who had already lost moral legitimacy and much of his political power. In pre-empting the democracy of the street, argues Walden Bello, the country's military has administered a cure that will prove worse than the disease

Nukes for all November 2006

Is the world on the brink of a new nuclear arms race, with North Korea's atomic bomb test marking the end of non-proliferation? John Gittings reports

A killing a day keeps democracy away October 2006

Left activists in the Philippines are being killed at an alarming rate. Oscar Reyes spoke to Millet Morante, a leading figure in Kilusan para sa Pambansang Demokrasya (KPD, Movement for National Democracy) and Laban Ng Masa (Struggle of the Masses), a coalition of progressive organisations and political parties

Doubly tough October 2006

Muslim women in India face a hard battle for equality and justice. Ari Paul reports on some of those seeking change

Telling the truth about Tibet December 2005

Construction cranes, it has been said, are the new national bird of China – and Tibet certainly has its share. Economic development also conceals what is happening under the surface.

Modern heroes, modern slaves April 2004

Doctors and nurses from the Philippines pay thousands of pounds so they can travel to the UK and work for as little as £8 a day in British hospitals and nursing homes.

Jakarta imposes martial law in Aceh June 2003

On 19 May 2003 the Indonesian government placed Aceh, one of Indonesia's most resource-rich provinces, under martial law. This followed the breakdown of a December 2002 peace agreement between the government and the Free Aceh Movement (Gam). Breaking the original agreement, the government demanded that Gam gave up its goal of independence and laid down its arms. When Gam refused, Indonesian president Megawati Sukarnoputri declared martial law





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