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Culture and media

Taking our cue from Raymond Williams’ ‘culture is ordinary’, we explore how politics works through old and new media, books, film, stage and screen, music and sport.

We cover a breadth of themes, from representations of class, race and gender in the arts, to progressive and reactionary uses of nostalgia, to the grassroots voices democratising the channels of communication.

media

Taking our cue from Raymond Williams’ ‘culture is ordinary’, we explore how politics works through old and new media, books, film, stage and screen, music and sport.

We cover a breadth of themes, from representations of class, race and gender in the arts, to progressive and reactionary uses of nostalgia, to the grassroots voices democratising the channels of communication.

media

  • An image of the Odesa Puppet Theatre building and an actor in a hat holding a puppet fox

    Puppetry thrives amid war in Ukraine

    The Odesa Puppet Theatre plays a vital role for Ukrainians facing the violence and trauma of war, explain Nataliia Borodina and Matt Smith

  • Games Gyān Caupar, Reise um die Erde, The Noble Game of Elephant and Castle, Settlers of Catan

    Game on! It’s time to decolonise play

    Mary Flanagan examines the sordid history of how colonialism has shaped the games we play – and how we can build play spaces free of it

  • Graphics from video games in a montage with people laughing playing a game

    How to stop getting played

    Games and play are everywhere under neoliberal capitalism. But they can also show us the way to a better future, argues Keir Milburn

  • A stylised photo of big tech headquarters with an Instagram logo prominent

    Big Tech: A new platform for global capitalism

    Over the past 30 years, tech companies have become leading institutions of global capitalism. They give a new face to old challenges – and new potential for mass resistance, writes Jeremy Gilbert

  • A stylised red flag waving on black background

    Red Pepper: how it all began

    The founders of Red Pepper – Tony Cook, Dee Searle, Clifford Singer and Hilary Wainwright – reflect on the birth of the magazine in 1994

  • A former public baths and wash house in London now boarded up and abandoned

    Shattered Nation – review

    Dorling’s book offers a damning portrait of a crumbling Britain, writes Phil O’Sullivan

  • On a pale yellow background there is a collage of images from Birmingham. One is a blue plaque for the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies and others are buildings with radical grafitti on them.

    Four quarters of radical Birmingham

    The ‘Gramscian project’ of the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, established in 1964 by Stuart Hall and Richard Hoggart at the University of Birmingham, left an indelible mark on the city. Josh Allen surveys its enduring radical edge

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