Maduro and the market
With the recent plunge in oil prices and radicalised opposition forces, can President Maduro keep the Bolivarian revolution on track? Steve Ellner writes

Is Venezuela burning? A debate
As anti-government protests continue in Venezuela, Mike Gonzalez argues that only a deepening of the Bolivarian revolution can save it. Below, Federico Fuentes responds

Venezuela: Different priorities
Jeffrey R Webber looks at the myths and the realities of the late Hugo Chávez’s impact on Venezuela, and considers the challenges ahead

Venezuela: The revolution begins today
The death of Hugo Chávez is a fundamental test for the Boliviarian Revolution, writes Uruguayan anthropologist Daniel Chavez

Hugo Chávez: A giant has left us
As the forces of reaction get ready to step up their offensive while trying their best to conceal their delight at Chávez’s death, Pablo Navarrete remembers his true legacy

Venezuela’s hip-hop revolutionaries
Jody McIntyre and Pablo Navarrete report on Venezuela’s Hip Hop Revolución movement

Venezuela’s Bolivarian Process at Twelve
Two articles exploring current developments in Venezuela are introduced by Red Pepper's Latin America editor Pablo Navarrete.

Venezuela: Putting People First
Jennie Bremner on the positive example provided by Venezuela and the need for solidarity.

South of the Border
Oliver Stone's new documentary chronicles the emergence of progressive governments in Latin America. Roberto Navarrete talks to him and Tariq Ali, one of the film's scriptwriters.

The community revolution
While international debate focuses on President Chávez, institutions of popular democracy are taking root in Venezuela's barrios. Pablo Navarrete introduces the importance of community councils, while Steve Ellner assesses their prospects for deepening the 'Bolivarian revolution'

Inside the Revolution: A Journey into the Heart of Venezuela
Derek Wall reviews Pablo Navarrete's new documentary

After the handshake
How far do Barak Obama's policies point to a real change in US/Latin American relations asks Grace Livingstone

Por ahora no pudimos
The defeat of President Hugo Chávez's constitutional reform proposals in December's referendum has triggered a wide debate on the Venezuelan left about the next steps in the country's Bolivarian revolution. Here, two articles by critical chavistas are introduced by Red Pepper's Latin America editor Pablo Navarrete

Why did abstention win?
The Jacobin vision of revolutions directed from above by vanguards and singular personalities has to be done away with, says Javier Biardeau. The abstainers in the Venezuelan referendum were taking a clear-cut stand against reform proposals that had not involved them

Grass-roots Chávismo awakes
Letting the grassroots lead is the only way forward from the referendum defeat, says Reinaldo Iturriza López

Democracy diary
Hilary Wainwright reports from Caracas on Venezuela's referendum - and the next steps towards reform

Chile or Venezuela – Which is the Good Democracy?
Outsiders who are looking for democracy in Latin America, and in particular, interesting experiments in its expansion, may choose to visit Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador and Argentina. In Chile, thus far, you will find a President who calls herself a socialist, twinkles at the edges of the system with some reforms, but not much else. Rodrigo Acuña reports

Doing the US’s bidding
Ex-CIA man Philip Agee sees many parallels between what the US is doing in Venezuela today and its successful efforts to undermine the Sandinista government in Nicaragua in the 1980s

Venezuela’s new model army
It was all very mysterious; but indicative of the seemingly random way things can happen in Venezuela. I had only a few days left in Caracas after the 2006 World Social Forum.

Chavez sweeps to victory in Venezuela’s referendum
The referendum victory takes the Venezuelan revolution to a new stage, writes David Raby

Showdown time in Venezuela
Hugo Chávez faces a test of his own devising as Venezuelans are given the opportunity to endorse or end his presidency.

Shanties into plough-sharing
David Raby is impressed by the first moves to make a new model of development in Venezuela

Is Chavez next for the Aristide treatment?
In April 2002 the US tried a classic military coup in Venezuela, but got their fingers burnt when it was defeated in 48 hours by a popular uprising backed by progressive forces in the military. Between December 2002 and January 2003, Washington incited a bosses' lockout which paralysed the oil industry. But the government regained control

Report on Venezuelan Labour: the Process Continues
Nationalise the Banks! Take over enterprises that have shutdown and run them instead by workers! Refuse to pay the external debt and use the funds to create jobs! Reduce the workweek to 36 hours! Create new enterprises under workers" control! These were some of the demands that emerged from the action programme workshop, which were enthusiastically endorsed by delegates to the first National Congress of the National Union of Workers (UNT) of Venezuela on August 1-2 2003.

Defending Chavez’s “Bolivarian Revolution”
In Venezuela, the political climate has become increasingly radical and polarised. Chávez's supporters and opponents no longer seem to speak the same language. As a result, any attempt to analyse what is going on comes up against the problem that the normal sources of information are notoriously biased. Nevertheless, beyond the rhetoric and the confusion, the basic options open to the society are becoming clearer. On the one hand, the hard core of the opposition to Chávez is more evidently committed to neoliberalism; and, on the other, a government characterised by the multiple contradictions typical of populist regimes begins to take important measures, which point in the direction of an alternative.

International solidarity with Venezuela takes off
Despite the misunderstanding and even hostility expressed by some leftists, the Bolivarian Revolution of President Hugo Chávez in Venezuela is seen more and more as a beacon of hope in a unipolar world. From 10-13 April 2003 - the first anniversary of the short-lived fascist coup against Chávez - thousands gathered in Caracas for an international solidarity meeting.

The Ramonet Affair
The ongoing campaign by various Venezuelan media outlets to discredit the government of president Hugo Chavez resulted in a rather embarrassing turn of events last month.

What’s happened to Venezuela’s dream of progress?
Monica Henriquez meets some Venezuelan dissidents