Human rights


The treatment of Shamima Begum should worry us all

13 March 2019 The government played fast and lose with fundamental rights, endangering children's lives in the process, argues Anita Hassan.

After Grenfell, we need to bring humanitarian responses into our politics if we want to save lives

17 October 2018 Neoliberalism means abandoning people to the whims of markets. Abby Meadows argues that we need to use the tools of humanitarianism to address the depth of the social crisis.

Citizenship in a capitalist state

4 September 2018 Lea Ypi writes on the death of citizenship as a democratic ideal, and the collapse of civic politics into ethnopolitics.

Britain’s Modern Slavery

13 March 2018 The Home Office estimates that there are currently around 13,000 slaves in the UK, though other sources suggest this is a a gross underestimate. And yet most of us remain oblivious to this reality of contemporary Britain, writes Abda Khan.

Our prison system is broken. Is it time to abolish prisons altogether?

16 February 2018 David Scott argues that our prison system represents a human rights disaster, and reformist solutions can't tackle the root problems.

We must challenge this government’s warped idea of free speech

5 January 2018 They're not defending free speech - they're just seeking to shore up their own power, writes Ilyas Nagdee

Theresa May’s ‘hostile environment’ for migrants endangers victims of trafficking.

30 October 2017 Theresa May claims to be tackling 'modern slavery' - but her immigration policies put vulnerable people further at risk, writes Zoe Gardner.

In light of Dunkirk: What have we learned from the (lack of) response in Calais?

3 May 2017 Amy Corcoran and Sam Walton ask who helps refugees when it matters – and who stands on the sidelines

The Confession – a survivor’s story

16 November 2016 Robert Rae reviews a new film about former Guantanamo prisoner Moazzam Begg

The EU-Turkey deal is a disaster for refugees

27 May 2016 In making a deal with Turkey, the EU is entrusting refugees to a government that cares little for their safety – and sponsors the terrorists they are fleeing from, writes Marienna Pope-Weidemann

The Torture Line

1 April 2006 The British government has tried to play down its role in rendition – the illegal removal of suspects from one country to another for questioning and, in some cases, torture. But there is mounting evidence that the Foreign Office, armed forces and intelligence services are complicit in this process, exposing British citizens and residents to ‘coercive interrogation’ techniques and opening up British airspace to US ‘torture flights’.