Win top price tickets to see The Duck House

Enter our free prize draw to see this new West End political comedy.

December 3, 2013 · 2 min read

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The Duck House is a new laugh-out-loud comedy set in a world of dodgy receipts, dodgier deceit, and pure Parliamentary panic.

May 2009. Gordon Brown’s government is in meltdown and a general election is just one year away. Labour backbencher Robert Houston loves being an MP and will do anything to save his seat – including changing sides. All is going well with his switch from red to blue until, on the eve of his final interview with Sir Norman Cavendish, a Tory grandee, the expenses scandal breaks.

As public fury mounts over taxpayers’ millions being frittered away on second homes, hanging baskets, moat-cleaning and duck houses, Robert and his secretarial staff (aka his wife Felicity and student son Seb), together with Seb’s girlfriend Holly and Russian housekeeper Ludmilla, find themselves in big, big trouble.

Ben Miller (BBC1’s Death in Paradise and The Armstrong and Miller Show) as the MP who’s got it all – and has claimed for most of it  – leads an all-star West End cast of Olivier award-winning National Theatre actress Nancy Carroll, Debbie Chazen, James Musgrave, Simon Shepherd  and Diana Vickers.

Tony & Olivier award-winning Terry Johnson (Hysteria, End of the Rainbow) directs this hilarious comedy from two writers who’ve been making fun of politicians for decades: Dan Patterson (BBC2’s Mock the Week) and Colin Swash (BBC1’s Have I Got News For You and Private Eye).

To be in with a chance of winning a pair of top price tickets to see The Duck House* simply email jenny@redpepper.org.uk with the subject line ‘duckhouse’, by 20 December.

The show is running until 29 March 2014 and you can call the box office on 0844 412 4663

*Terms and conditions apply. Prize is valid Mon-Thurs, until 27 Feb 2014, subject to availability. Prize is as stated and cannot be transferred or exchanged. No cash alternative will be offered.


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