Win tickets to see Maxine Peake at the Royal Court Theatre

Enter our free prize draw to win a pair of tickets to see How to Hold Your Breath

February 9, 2015 · 1 min read

Maxine PeakeEarlier this year we interviewed Maxine Peake about her socialist roots. This week we have two tickets to give away for her latest show:

‘Embark on an epic journey through Europe with sisters Dana (Maxine Peake) and Jasmine as they discover the true cost of principles in this twisted exploration of how we live now. Starting with a seemingly innocent one night stand, this darkly witty and magical thriller by Zinnie Harris dives into our recent European history’.

‘A truly titanic performance from Maxine Peake’ Time Out

To enter, simply email jenny@redpepper.org.uk by 6pm Friday 13 February, with the subject line ‘How to Hold Your Breath’.

Read more about the show on the The Royal Court Theatre website

Terms and conditions apply. Prize is valid Tuesday-Saturday until 21 March 2015. Subject to availability. Prize is as stated and cannot be transferred or exchanged.


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