Win a pair of tickets to see The Scottsboro Boys in London’s West End!

The Scottsboro Boys is a musical with a difference - an all singing, all dancing show about racism in 1930s America

November 6, 2014 · 2 min read

The scottsboro boyspmFollowing its sell out, award-winning season at the Young Vic, the critically acclaimed The Scottsboro Boys transfers to the West End for a strictly limited season.

Step right up and jump on board for this sensational musical which brings to life the extraordinary true story of nine black teenagers, in a case that changed history forever.

In 1931 nine black youths, who are on a train on the Southern Railway line between Chattanooga and Memphis, are hauled off and accused of raping two white women. In those days of rough justice, the youths were swiftly tried, convicted and sentenced to death.

Winner of the Critics’ Circle Best Musical Award 2013 and nominated for 6 Olivier Awards, don’t miss this all-singing, all-dancing, exhilarating and bold new musical.

The play is showing until 21 February 2015 at the Garrick Theatre, in London.

To get your hands on a pair of free tickets just email kitty@redpepper.org.uk with the subject line SCOTTSBORO by 24 November to be in with a chance of winning.*

*Tickets valid for Monday-Thursday performances, subject to availability, until 31st December (excluding week of 22 December). There is no cash alternative to the prizes, they are non-refundable and non-transferable and not for resale.


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