Win a pair of tickets to see Albion!

Albion is an explosive new play about the rise of the far right in modern Britain, set in an East End boozer, the unofficial home of the 'English Protection Army'.

September 15, 2014 · 2 min read

ALBION_300‘God bless this country, God bless karaoke and God save the Queen’

Centred around the increasingly strained relationship between two brothers, the play explores the EPA’s unstable leadership and how the group exploits the idea of diversity to pursue their aims… all to the tune of the pub’s karaoke night.

Playwright Chris Thompson promises that this ‘thrilling political theatre’ will make audiences come face to face with challenging ideas, explore the human need to express emotions and be heard, and understand the exploitive tactics used by the far right. Chris’ debut play, Carthage, premiered at Finborough early this year and was reviewed as ‘witty, sharp and well observed – a performance that packed a real punch’.

The play is showing until 25 October at Bush Theatre, Shepherd’s Bush, London.

To get your hands on a pair of free tickets email jenny@redpepper.org.uk with the subject line ALBION by 15 October to be in with a chance of winning.

(Terms & conditions apply. Prize is valid for all performances until 25th October. Prize is as stated and cannot be transferred or exchanged. Subject to availability).

Bush Theatre
7 Uxbridge Road

London

W12 8LJ
Box Office: 020 8743 5050
Fri 12th Sept – 25th Oct



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