Why immigration is good for all of us

New Class and Red Pepper immigration briefing now online

March 24, 2014 · 2 min read

Screen shot 2014-03-24 at 13.14.05The Centre for Labour and Social Studies (Class)  in association with Red Pepper have produced and made available online a new briefing on immigration titled ‘Why immigration is good for all of us.’

The 16 page, well referenced pdf locates Britain’s migration figures in a global context, outlines the contribution immigrants make to the British economy and dispels much publicised myths regarding so-called ‘benefit tourism’ and the impact of immigrants on wages and the job market.

In light of the contemporary media discourse that surrounds  immigration and its anticipated political importance in the run up to the 2015 general election this latest offering from Class and Red Pepper is a useful strategic resource with which to counter claims that bear little resemblance to the facts and serve only to stigmatise already marginalised communities.

‘Why immigration is good for all of us’ is the second briefing produced by Class and Red Pepper. The first, ‘Exposing the myths of welfare‘ can also be viewed online.

Class on twitter: @classthinktank

Email Class: info@classonline.org.uk


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