Where do the parties stand on climate change?

As election day gets closer, the Centre for Alternative Technology analyses the politicians' promises on the climate

May 6, 2015 · 2 min read

The Centre for Alternative Technology has put together a ‘Manifestometer’, looking at party political manifestos to compare parties’ climate and energy policies to see if they have what it takes to tackle climate change.

The at-a-glance table shows party responses to six crucial questions used to identify whether parties have based their proposals on climate science and if they go far enough in keeping us below a temperature rise of two degrees.

Download the PDF here

Party policies vary widely, from all-out action on climate change and transitioning to a low-carbon economy to banning windfarms and repealing the Climate Change Act.

2015 is going to be a big year for the climate: whichever party or coalition of parties wins this election will not only set the climate change agenda for the UK but will go on to represent the UK at the UN climate talks, scheduled to be held in Paris in December 2015. The spotlight will be turned on world leaders to make serious commitments to emissions reduction as support accelerates for an evidence-based net-zero agreement in Paris.

Climate change has been off the agenda during this election and yet is arguably the most important issue of our time. Before you vote, make sure you know where your party stands on climate change.

Read more at the Centre for Alternative Technology blog



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