Where do the parties stand on climate change?

As election day gets closer, the Centre for Alternative Technology analyses the politicians' promises on the climate

May 6, 2015 · 2 min read

The Centre for Alternative Technology has put together a ‘Manifestometer’, looking at party political manifestos to compare parties’ climate and energy policies to see if they have what it takes to tackle climate change.

The at-a-glance table shows party responses to six crucial questions used to identify whether parties have based their proposals on climate science and if they go far enough in keeping us below a temperature rise of two degrees.

Download the PDF here

Party policies vary widely, from all-out action on climate change and transitioning to a low-carbon economy to banning windfarms and repealing the Climate Change Act.

2015 is going to be a big year for the climate: whichever party or coalition of parties wins this election will not only set the climate change agenda for the UK but will go on to represent the UK at the UN climate talks, scheduled to be held in Paris in December 2015. The spotlight will be turned on world leaders to make serious commitments to emissions reduction as support accelerates for an evidence-based net-zero agreement in Paris.

Climate change has been off the agenda during this election and yet is arguably the most important issue of our time. Before you vote, make sure you know where your party stands on climate change.

Read more at the Centre for Alternative Technology blog


Manchester skyline

Why planning is political

Andrea Sandor explores how community-led developments are putting democracy at the heart of the planning process

Review – Tracksuits, Traumas and Class Traitors

D Hunter's 'Tracksuits, Traumas and Class Traitors' is an exploration of working-class struggle and strength, writes Liam Kennedy

Bank Job directors Daniel and Hilary

Review – Bank Job

Jake Woodier reviews a new documentary film that brings heist aesthetics to a story of debt activism


Beyond leek-flavoured UKism

‘Radical federalism’ should do more than rearrange the constitutional furniture, writes Undod’s Robat Idris

A street sign in Watford marks Colonial Way leading to Rhodes Way, Imperial Way and Clive Way

Statues, street names, and contested memory

Proudly 'anti-woke' posturing is just the latest government attempt to memorialise white supremacy. Meghan Tinsley reports on the politics of commemoration

Who decides what counts as ‘political’?

Government demands for public sector ‘neutrality’ uphold a harmful status quo. For civil servant Sophie Izon, it's time to speak out