We can win: stories from 50 years of struggle

Film launch night and an evening of discussion on economic justice movements past and present

December 16, 2013 · 2 min read

As part of the Economic Justice Project, the Jubilee Debt Campaign has produced ten short films covering 50 years of campaigning, strikes, occupations, work-ins and solidarity in the name of fair pay, decent jobs and economic justice. The films feature interviews with key organisers, speaking about their choice of tactics, what worked, what didn’t, and where they see the struggle for economic justice going today. Each film focuses on one of the following struggles:

• St Pancras Rent Strike 1960

• Dagenham Equal Pay Strikes 1968 & 1984

• Upper Clyde Shipworkers work in 1971 – 1972

• Grunwick Strike 1976 – 1978

• The Miners’ Strike 1984 – 1985

• The Poll Tax Rebellion 1989 – 1993

• Liverpool Dockers Strike 1995 – 1998

• The Living Wage 2002 – 2007 (and ongoing)

• Occupy (London) 2011 – now

• Disabled People Against the Cuts & Uk Uncut: now

The film launch night is taking place at Rich Mix in Bethnal Green (London) on Tuesday, January 14 and will also feature a discussion with the film maker and organisers from key contemporary economic justice movements in London for a chance to talk about how social justice activists today can learn from the lessons of other movements past and present.

We Can Win Film Launch

Tuesday 14 January 2014, 6.30pm

Rich Mix, 35-47 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA



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