Video: why UK Uncut are returning to Vodafone

Lucy and Sarah from UK Uncut talk to the Artist Taxi Driver about their plans to return to Vodafone Saturday 14 June

June 13, 2014 · 2 min read

Vodafone was UK Uncut’s first target in 2010, and the group say the government has still not done enough to stop them dodging tax. Protesters are demanding Vodafone pay the billions in tax owed to the public purse and they will occupy Vodafone shops to transform them into ‘Vodahomes’, housing shelters and housewarming parties.

Nine Vodafone stores across the UK will be targetted with support from anti-austerity groups Focus E15 (who fight for social housing) and Disabled People Against the Cuts.

“Tomorrow we’ll show the government that they can’t let big business of the hook on huge amounts of tax avoidance. The money Vodafone owe could pay for thousands of new homes, or could stop the bedroom tax and benefit cap many times over. It’s unacceptable that the government choose to let rich tax dodgers off the hook, while making the poorest pay for a crisis they didn’t cause” said UK Uncut member Stef Johnson.

Find your nearest local action here and follow #vodahome on twitter.

Watch part two of the interview: What happened at the Fortnum and Mason occupation mass arrest? How have the government reacted to your legal challenges? What about Google and Amazon? What will your action achieve?

Watch part three: Why help raise tax funds for a government you don’t support? And why aren’t there more riots in the streets over austerity?

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