Video: The true cost of the Afghanistan war

This video charts the rising costs in billions of pounds - and human lives

September 29, 2011 · 2 min read

The war in Afghanistan is nearly 10 years old. Thousands of Afghan civilians and hundreds of British troops have been killed in what is widely acknowledged to be an unwinnable and unjust war. On top this the war is wracking up huge financial costs at a time of drastic cuts to welfare and public servcies. £4.5 billion a year is currently spent on the war, the same amount that is being cut from public sector pensions.

And while the government and mainstream media would like to make out that the war is winding down, these costs, on all fronts, are rising. Casualty rates are at their highest since the war began and the budget for the war grows year on year. In just over 2 minutes this video charts the rising costs in human life and billions of pounds. For all the essential facts on the war, and to find out why we have to get the troops out, watch this video.

Narrated by Tony Benn with music by Brian Eno.

Join the anti-war mass assembly, Trafalgar Square, Saturday 8 October, from 12noon. www.antiwarassembly.org



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