The Spark of learning

Morten Thaysen Laurberg previews a week of workshops, skill shares, organising, and talks in London in the lead up to the G8

May 22, 2013 · 2 min read

From 10-15 June in London The Spark is promising a packed programme of workshops and events exploring what a more socially and economically just world would look like and how we can get there.

The SparkIn the run up to the G8, where leaders of the world’s most powerful countries will assemble in the UK, the Spark will host a range of events for people to learn, create, and connect around social justice issues. With workshops and talks about a broad spectrum of topics and methods, the space aims to bring together people and groups that don’t usually work together, to see what we can learn from each other, and to build networks and relationships that will help bring more strength and unity to groups and individuals fighting for social justice.

During the days groups and organisations such as Jubilee Debt Campaign and the London Roots Collective will be hosting a large selection of workshops on everything from economics to direct action. Maddy Evans from Jubilee Debt Campaign advises people to register for the daytime workshops, as there are limited spaces available.

Each evening has a specific theme and will feature films, talks, and debates with activists, food growers, community organisers and many more.

Monday: Life and debt – An evening of film and discussion with Jubilee Debt Campaign and friends.


Tuesday: Military Britain – A discussion on the UK arms trade, military spending and new drone technology.

Wednesday: Food sovereignty – An evening with the growing food sovereignty movement.

Thursday: The climate room – connecting the dots between climate and cuts.

Friday: Policing and security in the UK

All in all The Spark looks like an exciting opportunity to learn, share knowledge, and organise before the G8.

You can find more information at: www.thesparkspace.org


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