The new year’s feminist web round-up

Feminist blogger Emma Frankel-Thorin shares the posts that have made her laugh and cry so far this year.

January 27, 2014 · 3 min read

EmmaHow to be a fan of problematic things – I’d like to start this month’s list off with a slightly older post. I think people do need to hear that liking problematic things does not make them a bad person. This post details how you can critique the things you like that. It’s important that you don’t ignore or defend those problems.

On Beyoncé and black feminism –  This is a great piece about Beyoncé’s much acclaimed new album & feminism.

A Year in Review –  The top 10 most racist/privileged things white feminists did in 2013

An alternative look at 2013 –  A lovely post by Sam with some guests talking about how intersectionality finally gave women of colour a voice in feminism.

‘It’s our differences, our “otherness” that binds us together’ – I love this interview with Reni Eddo-Lodge  about Intersectionality.


White singers deserve the same scrutiny for sexism as Snoop Dogg –  A lot of people have been saying this for a long time. I am glad to see it in a big name paper but exasperated that it’s been ignored for so long and continues to be so since this piece was published.

In defence of prostitutes –  Rupert Everett who is himself open about his past as a sex worker writes beautifully about the SoHo raids. He details why they were (and will continue to be) so awful.

Stop fawning over male feminists – Seriously though. Stop!

I’ve been enjoying a lot of spoken word poetry recently so here are 3 YouTube videos of my current favourites:

This next one is surprising because you start off being so angry at him but then you just want to give him a big old squeeze for getting it:

The first round of a poetry slam that T. Miller goes on to win:

Emma blogs at www.emmaquitefrankly.blogspot.co.uk @ExtraFT


The Socialist Olympics of 1936

Radical workers’ sporting organisations and the 1936 People’s Olympiad illustrate the role of sport in fighting oppression, writes Uma Arruga i López.

Review – You’re History: The Twelve Strangest Women in Music

Lesley Chow argues for a new kind of music criticism that re-evaluates women musicians and "meaningless" music, writes Rhian E Jones

Lying through their legacy-speak

Olympic ‘legacy’ has greased the path for enormous, upward transfer of wealth to the global propertied classes, writes Jules Boykoff


SWexit: What are exit schemes for sex workers missing?

If earning money is a fundamental reason for entering the sex industry, it is also essential to leaving it, writes Marin Scarlett.

Failure to deliver

Major financial institutions have cited Deliveroo’s employment practices for its disastrous public share launch. Alice Martin and Tom Powdrill look at what went wrong and what it might mean for workers’ rights

Power on the picket line: remembering the Burnsall Strike

Almost 30 years on, Sarbjit Johal recalls supporting the strike, which consisted of mostly Punjabi women workers

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