The new year’s feminist web round-up

Feminist blogger Emma Frankel-Thorin shares the posts that have made her laugh and cry so far this year.

January 27, 2014 · 3 min read

EmmaHow to be a fan of problematic things – I’d like to start this month’s list off with a slightly older post. I think people do need to hear that liking problematic things does not make them a bad person. This post details how you can critique the things you like that. It’s important that you don’t ignore or defend those problems.

On Beyoncé and black feminism –  This is a great piece about Beyoncé’s much acclaimed new album & feminism.

A Year in Review –  The top 10 most racist/privileged things white feminists did in 2013

An alternative look at 2013 –  A lovely post by Sam with some guests talking about how intersectionality finally gave women of colour a voice in feminism.

‘It’s our differences, our “otherness” that binds us together’ – I love this interview with Reni Eddo-Lodge  about Intersectionality.


White singers deserve the same scrutiny for sexism as Snoop Dogg –  A lot of people have been saying this for a long time. I am glad to see it in a big name paper but exasperated that it’s been ignored for so long and continues to be so since this piece was published.

In defence of prostitutes –  Rupert Everett who is himself open about his past as a sex worker writes beautifully about the SoHo raids. He details why they were (and will continue to be) so awful.

Stop fawning over male feminists – Seriously though. Stop!

I’ve been enjoying a lot of spoken word poetry recently so here are 3 YouTube videos of my current favourites:

This next one is surprising because you start off being so angry at him but then you just want to give him a big old squeeze for getting it:

The first round of a poetry slam that T. Miller goes on to win:

Emma blogs at www.emmaquitefrankly.blogspot.co.uk @ExtraFT


Morality tales

From cowardly men to wayward wives, pre-modern superstitions transmitted social norms as well as scares, writes Eleanor Janega

Playing on the dark side: An interview with Dawn Ray’d

Gerry Hart speaks to Simon Barr of Dawn Ray'd about black metal, its relationship with the far right and its radical potential

The global spectres of ‘Asian horror’

Bliss Cua Lim looks at how the female ghost subgenre illuminates efforts to globalise ‘Asian horror’


Rudolf Rocker: an anarchist ‘rabbi’ in London

David J. Lobina rediscovers a forgotten but fascinating figure in London’s radical and Jewish history

Review – Falling Down: The Conservative Party and the Decline of Tory Britain by Phil Burton-Cartledge

Sabrina Huck argues that a generational shift away from the Conservative Party can’t be taken for granted

The driver of dispossession

Tina Ngata explains the social and legal legacies of a 15th-century Christian principle that paved the way for imperial violence in, and far beyond, New Zealand

Want to try Red Pepper before you take out a subscription? Sign up to our newsletter and read Issue 231 for free.