#strikeup conversation on the picket lines

#strikeup and share your experiences and thoughts about what it means to be on strike

October 10, 2014 · 2 min read

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Photo: Kheel Centre/Flikr. Workers of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union on strike.

In the run up to and during next week’s strikes and the TUC demo (October 18), Plan C are asking people to #strikeup conversation with other people about what it means to be on strike. These could be one line questions or a whole dialogue.

‘Ask on the school runs or the picket lines, ask over Facebook or in person, and publish on social media using the hashtag #strikeup. Alternatively, email your answers (and photos!) to info@weareplanc.org’

Plan C have also suggested a number of relevant questions, including but not limited to:

– Why are you on strike?

– Why is it/ isn’t it possible for you to strike?

– What have you had to do differently with your day because you are on strike?

– What do you hate about work?

– What do you think work will be like in the future?

– What would you like the future of work to be like?

– How close to your full desires is ‘we demand a pay-rise’?

– What do you think will change as a result of the strike?

So #strikeup and speak up.



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