Red Pepper Blog Awards 2014

The Red Pepper team chose their top 10 bloggers of the year, listed in no particular order

December 26, 2014 · 3 min read

birdsA better NHS
Jonathon Tomlinson is an NHS GP in Hackney who writes about the scandal of the NHS; ‘its conversion into a pre-1948 (start of the NHS) market economy as a result of steady lobbying from UK and US private health insurers and a prevailing neoliberal political ideology’. @mellojonny

Bristling Badger
Provides detailed coverage of the spycops scandal, including the campaign for justice lead by activist women who had long-term relationships with undercover police. @MerrickBadger

Tree Hugging Hoolah
Following the supply chains of arms used in current conflicts, particularly incidents in Africa that barely receive coverage outside of the Francophone African press. More recently the writer has focused on tax avoidance closer to home.

Atomic Ephemera (tumblr)
Dr Jacquelyn Arnold explores nuclear civil defence, Cold War culture, psychogeography, atomic ephemera, public information films, hauntology and 1970s Britain. @drjacarnold

Another Angry Voice
This blog needs no introduction. Yorkshire man Thomas G. Clark regularly reaches tens and hundreds of thousands of people with his Facebook posts covering economics, philosophy and politics. @Angry_Voice


Kate Belgrave
Featuring interviews with people who rely on public services and have fought against the privatisation and erosion of those services. Kate shared the stories of the Focus E15 mothers well before their campaign hit the headlines. @hangbitch

The Void
‘Narking off the state since 2005’ – includes coverage of benefits cuts, perverse sanctions, workfare, the DWP and Job Centre shambles. @johnnyvoid

Gradient Lair
Trudy created this blog as a Black woman’s space for reflection on art, media, social media, socio-politics and culture. @gradientlair

Tim Holmes
Writings on ‘life, the world and current events’, including commentary on the mainstream press.

Another Angry Woman
The personal blog of Zoe Stavri. ‘Part anarchist. Part feminist. All angry… a mishmash of feminism, psychology, politics and navel-gazing’.


Can radical federalism save the UK?

Professor Kevin Morgan asks whether radical federalism offers a progressive alternative to the break up of the United Kingdom?

The truth wins out

Francesca Emanuele reports on recent attacks on Bolivia’s Movement for Socialism – and how the country’s voters were ultimately undeterred by disinformation tactics

Illustration of Algerian protestor by Intifada Street

Yetnahaw Gaâ! Algeria’s democratic resistance

Sanhaja Akrouf explains how the fear that stopped Algerians from joining the uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa in 2011 has now been broken


After the Spring

Despite the carnage of contemporary Syria and Libya, and the ruinous stalemate of Yemen, the euphoric appeal of what was once described as the ‘Arab Spring’ continues to feed revolutionary processes across the region, argues Toufic Haddad

Review – Asylum for Sale: Profit and Protest in the Migration Industry

Siobhán McGuirk and Adrienne Pine's edited volume is a powerful indictment of the modern migration complex writes Nico Vaccari

End SARS and Fanon’s mission

The uprisings against police brutality that swept across Nigeria must be contextualised within the country’s colonial history, argues Kehinde Alonge