Reactions to the US election result

As news of a Trump victory sinks in, we share words of solidarity and calls to action from activists across the left in the UK.

November 9, 2016 · 5 min read

Take Back The City:

“Lots of people of colour, women, queer folk, disabled folk, Muslims across America will be feeling scared and disillusioned- as are many here in London, across the UK and Europe. The appetite for change is clear. The status quo is dead. We think it doesn’t just have to mean scary folk like Trump getting power, but that we too can create power in this space. The need to get together and organise has never been greater. If you’re ready to put your head and heart together with other Londoners who know life has to be fairer, more creative – and that the job to make that happen is ours – then get in touch and get stuck in.”

Global Justice Now:

“We will resist everything Trump stands for. But we can only do that by building something better. Only in a society in which everyone has their needs met and which is built on openness, on community and on equality, can we truly defeat these ideas.” Read the full blog here.

Black Lives Matter UK:

“Our thoughts go to our fam in the US who already face the brunt of this backlash. Our queer, undocumented, poor, incarcerated, muslim, working class, marginalised, Black, Indigenous and Brown family. Our family resisting in Flint and Standing Rock. We know that Trump’s election is a speedier race to the bottom. We recognise violence and danger when it gets voted in. Both outcomes would have been bad. This one signals a green light for the worst. Our family in the US already know what they gotta do. Trump or Hilary, racist wall or mass incarceration, proud predator or drone-prone mass murderer, today was never going to be a day for celebration. This is why, everywhere, we organise.”

Caroline Lucas:

“This is a devastating day for women, for people of colour, for disabled people and for an inclusive society in the USA. Trump’s election is also a hammer blow for the fight against climate change – and presents a genuine threat to some of the poorest people in the world who will suffer its worst effects. But this is no time to mourn – instead we must organize like never before to keep our communities cohesive and our climate safe. On this dark day we extend the hand of friendship to people in the USA who wake up in fear – we know that you are not defined by the hatred espoused by your new president. But it’s at times like this when we need to unite, learn, resist and hope more than ever before. Today, in whatever ways we can, let’s light a candle rather than curse the darkness.” Watch Caroline’s video statement.

Adie Nistelrooy, UK activist:

“If we’re just going to shout stupid Americans over Trump, and stupid little England over Brexit then frankly we’re part of the problem. There’s a big anti-establishment sentiment across the West. It’ll end up in the hands of zenophobic nationalist movements if we don’t actually involve ourselves with the concerns of people in the forgotten towns and backwaters who voted Brexit and Trump. Even though they represent the corporate elites just as much as the Democrat/New Labour establishment, they are seen as the only movements reaching out to them in rebellion. Shouting and screaming you’re so horrible and stupid, or crying we’re all going to die is neither accurate or helpful but part of the problem and from what I can see often comes from privileged lefties/liberals. Take steps to organise and grow movements against the establishment that involve people at the rough and forgotten end. If you don’t there’ll be more Brexits and more Trumps. If the outrage is not turned into action to actually deal with what’s happening then it isn’t genuine and is another example of the abject failure of middle class identity politics and lefty trendyism.”

Rebecca Solnit, American writer:

“There is no way around this is horrible. There are things to do. Draw together with people you love, work hard at making spaces, times, networks in which our ideals and values prevail, reach out for the vulnerable, and pitch your tents big, because this ugliness is all about exclusion and narrowness and not wanting to deal with people who are different or even people who have slightly different ideas, and the left can be as fucked-up in this regard as anyone. Love is what you have, and generosity, and imagination. What we have. These are centers of resistance, and the resistance is what you go out into the world with the strength and vision you gather inside.”

See Jeremy Corbyn’s statement here.

Follow #HereToStay on Twitter for statements by undocumented migrants.

Read ‘An open letter to Our Nation from 100 women of colour leaders


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