Preston event: The radical case for Scottish independence

Red Pepper magazine and The Hannah Mitchell Foundation invite you to hear the radical case for independence and to discuss what this could mean for the North of England

July 31, 2014 · 2 min read

scotland-thinTuesday 12 August, 7-8.30pm at The Continental, Preston

Book your free ticket

On 18 September Scotland votes on whether to become independent. Scotland this summer is alive with civic debate on this momentous decision. Robin McAlpine and the Radical Independence Campaign are at the most exciting cutting edge of this debate, as they imagine and argue for a totally new, better Scotland. What does this mean for the North of England? Can we get a new start too? Come to hear and discuss with:

Robin McAlpine, Director, The Jimmy Reid Foundation

Paul Salveson, The Hannah Mitchell Foundation

And then… come and join the Yes train to Scotland!

Red Pepper are organising a trip to Scotland for a weekend of campaigning and exploring on 6th September. There will be a women’s delegation and the trip is open to all. For details on how to join email jenny@redpepper.org.uk


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