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Photos from the Fracked Future Carnival

Protesters challenged the frackers as they gathered in London for a conference today, reports Kara Moses

March 19, 2014
3 min read


Kara MosesKara Moses is Red Pepper's Environment Editor and a freelance writer and activist


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frack1Hundreds gather outside a hotel in Knightsbridge where the 2014 Shale Gas Forum was scheduled to take place today. At £1,000 per person for entry, the forum was ‘exclusive’, and included speakers from the Department of Energy and Climate Change and the Environment Agency, as well as executives of fracking companies Cuadrilla and iGas. Picture: @climate_rev

frack2‘The only thing that can save us from fracking is you, the British public.’ Vivienne Westwood speaks to press and protesters. Picture: @JamieKelseyFry

frack3Organisers moved the location of the forum at the last minute, citing security concerns. But the protesters were hot on the trail, soon arriving at the military-protected HAC Armoury House in Old Street. Picture: @JamieKelseyFry

frack4The carnival included a samba band and a live DJ set outside Armoury House, while the conference went ahead under tight security. Picture: @FrackOffLondon

frack5Meanwhile ‘Lord Brown’s Integrity’ is put up for sale on eBay by Young Friends of The Earth – ‘brand new, unused’. The auction reached £13.50 before being removed by eBay. Picture: @Jay_Doobie

frack6Speakers from a range of groups and affected communities. Here, a speaker from Frack Off London, who organised the protest. Picture: @climate_rev

frack7Residents from affected communities including those in Wales and Barton Moss came to voice concerns. People came dressed as zombies to express their vision of what a ‘fracked future’ could look like. @JamieKelseyFry

frack8Campaigners from the south east hold a banner. Balcombe in West Sussex was the site of mass protests last summer. Picture @BrendaPollack

frack9A protester holds a placard outside Armoury House. A number of the fracking conference’s speakers are reported to have cancelled at the last minute. The protest ended peacefully. Picture: @MSAppropriation


Kara MosesKara Moses is Red Pepper's Environment Editor and a freelance writer and activist


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