People’s Parliament to hold two events this week

The People's Parliament is back this week, hosting discussions on the citizen's income and the student movement

March 3, 2014 · 2 min read

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The People’s Parliament, a free discussion series held in Parliament and hosted by John McDonnell MP, is holding two more events this week.

Citizen’s income: a minor policy change that would transform our society:

On Tuesday 4 March, Natalie Bennett, leader of the Green Party, will be joined by Professor Guy Standing of SOAS and Dr Malcom Terry, Director of the Citizen’s Income Trust, to discuss the merits of the Citizen’s Income, or Basic Income. As a policy initiative, the Citizen’s Income has experienced a surge in popularity of late and Tuesday’s discussion will provide a welcome opportunity to learn more and ask important questions. For more information on the citizen’s income see Basic Income UK or the following article on Novara Media: Do they owe us a living: seven reasons a universal basic income is worth fighting for.

Tuesday 4th March, 6.30pm – 8.30pm, Committee Room 5, House of Commons. Register your free place here.

Universities and dissent since 2010: a new politics?

On Wednesday 5 March, the People’s Parliament will run for the second time in two days as the topic shifts to student campaigning and the fight against the privatisation of higher education. Speakers include: Michael Chessum, President of the University of London Union; Rhiannon Colvin, founder of Alternative Generation; Sonia Chura, Vice-President University of London IWGB branch/3 Cosas; Olga Nelly Alvarez-Perez of the Independent Workers Union of Great Britain and activists from Occupy Sussex and Defend Education Birmingham.

Wednesday 5th March, 6.30pm – 8.30pm, Committee Room 6, House of Commons. Register your free place here.


The Socialist Olympics of 1936

Radical workers’ sporting organisations and the 1936 People’s Olympiad illustrate the role of sport in fighting oppression, writes Uma Arruga i López.

Review – You’re History: The Twelve Strangest Women in Music

Lesley Chow argues for a new kind of music criticism that re-evaluates women musicians and "meaningless" music, writes Rhian E Jones

Lying through their legacy-speak

Olympic ‘legacy’ has greased the path for enormous, upward transfer of wealth to the global propertied classes, writes Jules Boykoff


SWexit: What are exit schemes for sex workers missing?

If earning money is a fundamental reason for entering the sex industry, it is also essential to leaving it, writes Marin Scarlett.

Failure to deliver

Major financial institutions have cited Deliveroo’s employment practices for its disastrous public share launch. Alice Martin and Tom Powdrill look at what went wrong and what it might mean for workers’ rights

Power on the picket line: remembering the Burnsall Strike

Almost 30 years on, Sarbjit Johal recalls supporting the strike, which consisted of mostly Punjabi women workers

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