Peoples Agenda profile 7: Sisters Uncut

After shutting down Oxford Street on Valentines Day, Sisters Uncut talk about the need to keep fighting cuts to domestic violence services in this seventh profile in our People's Agenda series

April 9, 2015 · 2 min read

SistersUncut

peoples agenda ‘We demand an end to all cuts to domestic violence services and restored funding where necessary. Safety is right, not a privilege, and we’ll keep fighting until this becomes a reality for all.’

On February 14th, hundreds of women joined hands and brought all traffic at Oxford Circus to a halt. We are Sisters Uncut – a group of self-defining women who have come together to take direct action against the fatal cuts to domestic violence services.

In a country where 2 women each week are killed by their current or former partner, it’s a travesty that refuges are forced to turn women away as they seek safety.

So we’re fighting.


Our message to those in power is this – these cuts are sexist. Austerity is making it harder for women to leave dangerous relationships and to live safe lives. We’re taking a stand against these cuts, and taking action against austerity.

We’ve put together our own agenda. We demand an end to all cuts to domestic violence services and restored funding where necessary. Safety is right, not a privilege, and we’ll keep fighting until this becomes a reality for all.

Expect vibrant and creative protests as we raise our voice against closures to domestic violence services.

Austerity cuts are ideological, but cuts to domestic violence services are fatal. This is just the start – let’s put an end to this.

To find out more visit: @sistersuncut

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.

Join Red Pepper for our free event on 22 April in London- Beyond the Ballot Box: Ways we can Win.


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