Peoples Agenda profile 6: Ritzy Living Wage campaign

Thirteen days of strike action in the space of five months convinced Ritzy cinema staff of the need to get organised at work, they explain in this sixth profile in our People's Agenda series

April 8, 2015 · 2 min read

RLW

peoples agendaWe know from experience though that in the end workers need to organise themselves to win these basic rights and others, that is the only answer.’

We, as workers at The Ritzy Cinema, took 13 days of strike action last year over 5 months in our struggle with our employer Picturehouse Cinemas for the London Living Wage, eventually securing a 26% pay rise over three years.

The current National Minimum Wage is £6.50ph. The Living Wage is £7.85 an hour outside London and £9.15 and hour in London. This gulf between the legally enforceable Minimum Wage and the actual rate people need to have a basic, decent standard of living is scandalous.

Politicians and business people regularly appear on television to stress that they support the Living Wage but only as a voluntary scheme. Low paid workers are tired of being told to put up with poverty pay by people who earn 10 times the Living Wage or more.

The National Minimum Wage should be set at the level of the Living Wage by law, this is a basic human right. It is also makes sound economic sense: low paid workers pay taxes which support public services and spend their money which stimulates economic activity. The rich move their money off shore and hoard it.

We know from experience though that in the end workers need to organise themselves to win these basic rights and others, that is the only answer.

To find out more visit: @ritzylivingwage

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.

Join Red Pepper for our free event on 22 April in London- Beyond the Ballot Box: Ways we can Win.



A Green New Deal could signal a fundamental shift away from neoliberalism

It's not just a policy programme, it could be an overall shift in the political and economic ideas that dominate society. By Laurie Laybourn-Langton

Higher! Further! Faster! More!

Captain Marvel is Marvel's first blockbuster with a female lead. Miriam Kent asks what we should make of it all these female superheroes taking over the big screen.

A new civilising mission

The treatment of Muslim women shows that French feminism has not shed some imperialist and racist practices, argues Malia Bouattia


It’s time to overhaul the House of Lords

When even Peers are rising up for reform, something’s in the air, writes Nancy Platts. Our movement should get behind it

Climate Striker: We must take on capitalism if we want to avert chaos

Failure is not an option, writes Zoe Rasbash

The treatment of Shamima Begum should worry us all

The government played fast and lose with fundamental rights, endangering children's lives in the process, argues Anita Hassan.