People’s Agenda profile 3: 999 Call for the NHS

After marching from Jarrow to London last year, 999 Call for the NHS explain their plans for the coming year in this third profile in our People's Agenda series

April 2, 2015 · 2 min read

999 call

peoples agenda ‘999 Call for the NHS is a truly grassroots campaign and proud to remain independent from any party politics & political influence. Politicians, lobbyists, policy makers – we ask questions of them all, going beyond politics. We have one mission and that is to save the National Health Service from fragmentation & privatisation – whatever it takes.’

999 Call for the NHS organised last August’s People’s March for the NHS, a 300 mile march retracing the route of the original Jarrow crusade. Founded by Joanna Adams and a group of working women from Darlington, nicknamed the #darlomums, it has become a national organisation campaigning to save the NHS from the greed & corruption of private companies (who wish to sacrifice one of the greatest institutions of our country, recognised globally as the most cost-effective and efficient health service in the world.)

We call for an end to PFI (Public Finance Initiative), an end to cuts & underfunding and the complete rejection of TTIP (Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership). It believes that the only way to defend and preserve the NHS is to stay true to Nye Bevan’s founding principles of a publicly owned, publicly funded NHS – removing the internal market and bringing the NHS back into public ownership.

We are currently supporting the development of the NHS Reinstatement Bill and campaigning against the recent proposals known as ‘Devo Manc’ with a variety of inspiring events planned in the run up to the election and beyond.

To find out more visit: 999callfornhs.org.uk

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.

Join Red Pepper for our free event on 22 April in London- Beyond the Ballot Box: Ways we can Win.


The Socialist Olympics of 1936

Radical workers’ sporting organisations and the 1936 People’s Olympiad illustrate the role of sport in fighting oppression, writes Uma Arruga i López.

Review – You’re History: The Twelve Strangest Women in Music

Lesley Chow argues for a new kind of music criticism that re-evaluates women musicians and "meaningless" music, writes Rhian E Jones

Lying through their legacy-speak

Olympic ‘legacy’ has greased the path for enormous, upward transfer of wealth to the global propertied classes, writes Jules Boykoff


SWexit: What are exit schemes for sex workers missing?

If earning money is a fundamental reason for entering the sex industry, it is also essential to leaving it, writes Marin Scarlett.

Failure to deliver

Major financial institutions have cited Deliveroo’s employment practices for its disastrous public share launch. Alice Martin and Tom Powdrill look at what went wrong and what it might mean for workers’ rights

Power on the picket line: remembering the Burnsall Strike

Almost 30 years on, Sarbjit Johal recalls supporting the strike, which consisted of mostly Punjabi women workers

Want to try Red Pepper before you take out a subscription? Sign up to our newsletter and read Issue 231 for free.