People’s Agenda profile 27: Independent Workers of Great Britain University of London branch

The IWGB are taking on and winning high profile workplace struggles in traditionally precarious workplaces we find out in this twenty-seventh People's Agenda profile

May 13, 2015 · 2 min read

IWGBpeoples agenda ‘This campaign model (worker-led, militant and featuring intensive social media and press pressure) is now being exported across London, with similar battles being waged at John Lewis, the Barbican, the Royal Opera House, Bloomberg and more. More and more workers are realising that through the IWGB they can be successful in winning both the London Living Wage and substantial improvements to their terms and conditions.’

The IWGB is an independent union, the majority of whose members are vulnerable migrant workers, often outsourced, frequently non-English speaking, and previously invisible. This is now changing, as a consequence of high-profile struggles such as the 3 Cosas Campaign, which successfully won improved holiday and sick pay rights for contract workers at the University of London.

This campaign model (worker-led, militant and featuring intensive social media and press pressure) is now being exported across London, with similar battles being waged at John Lewis, the Barbican, the Royal Opera House, Bloomberg and more. More and more workers are realising that through the IWGB they can be successful in winning both the London Living Wage and substantial improvements to their terms and conditions.

The IWGB also recognises that case work is central to building support and ensuring that activists are protected against recriminations, and as such prioritises the representation of workers at grievances and disciplinaries, and seeks to ensure all who need it get an opportunity to be represented at an Employment Tribunal.

A government that was committed to helping this oft-exploited workforce should immediately repeal the recent ET fees, and legislate to remove the current restrictive anti-strike laws. Then you’d really see some action!

To find out more: @IWGBUoL

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.


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