People’s Agenda profile 24: #LivingWageFootball

Taking on Premier League clubs over their huge pay inequalities, Football Beyond Borders are our twenty-fourth People's Agenda profile

May 7, 2015 · 2 min read

FBBpeoples agenda ‘It would take a cleaner at Manchester United over 19 years to earn as much as their misfiring striker Radamel Falcao earns in a week. Our #LivingWageFootball campaign works with fan groups, club staff and community organisers to highlight this injustice and pressure clubs to become accredited Living Wage employers.’

Football is a microcosm of society, and nowhere is this clearer than in the huge pay differential between players and other staff at clubs such as cleaners, waiters and stewards. The Premier League is a perfect example of what happens when the market is allowed to run riot, with players paid six figure sums every week, while other staff struggle to get by on the minimum wage.

It would take a cleaner at Manchester United over 19 years to earn as much as their misfiring striker Radamel Falcao earns in a week. Our #LivingWageFootball campaign works with fan groups, club staff and community organisers to highlight this injustice and pressure clubs to become accredited Living Wage employers.

Football Beyond Borders is a grassroots, youth-led organisation that harnesses the power of the beautiful game to enact positive social change. We run educational projects in some of London’s most deprived schools and estates and use football as a tool to campaign against structural inequality and oppression.

When acting together, fans, workers and community groups have the power to bring about a radical redistribution of the wealth that is sloshing around the Premier League. We will be working with grassroots unions to provide workplace organiser training and set up local football union branches, which will work in collaboration with the wider campaign to fight poverty pay at football clubs.

To find out more: @FBeyondBorders

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.


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