People’s Agenda profile 20: Fuel Poverty Action

Combining direct action with mutual support and organising with pensioners, Fuel Poverty Action are the twentieth group profiled in our People's Agenda series

April 28, 2015 · 2 min read

fpa1peoples agenda ‘Fuel Poverty Action has been organizing for four years with people directly affected by fuel poverty, including pensioners, disabled activists, housing campaigns and migrant groups to take on the Big Six bullies and this unjust energy system.’

Each winter, thousands of pensioners die early, unnecessary deaths from cold homes across the UK, whilst millions of households suffer misery and ill-health. For many, the worry of energy debt and the inability to afford energy for basic living, including washing, cooking and lighting, lasts year round as incomes fall and energy prices continue to increase. The Big Six energy companies are not only making astounding profits out of our basic need for energy, their reliance on fossil fuels is drawing us closer to climate chaos.

Fuel Poverty Action has been organizing for four years with people directly affected by fuel poverty, including pensioners, disabled activists, housing campaigns and migrant groups to take on the Big Six bullies and this unjust energy system. We organize mutual support and collective action on the energy issues we face and target the Big Six and their government friends with creative campaigns and actions.

Our recently launched Energy Bill of Rights sets out some of our ideas on what an alternative energy system can look like, hopefully inspiring people to take action where they are to begin to make this a reality. We want a fair, affordable, renewable energy system controlled by us!

To find out more: Fuel Poverty Action Facebook

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.


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