People’s Agenda profile 19: EFA London

Free, participatory English classes are supporting adult migrants in London to take action against injustice, EFA London tell us in this twentieth People's Agenda series profile

April 28, 2015 · 2 min read

efalondon1peoples agenda ‘Our principle “tactic” is participatory education itself. Teachers and students use the classes to critically engage with important issues and to plan action that will help bring about the change they want.’

EFA London (English for Action) provides free English language (ESOL) classes for adult migrants living in London. We believe that adult migrant language education is a prerequisite for democratic engagement. Put simply, without speaking English it becomes very difficult to change the status quo. With the right focus ESOL can help bring about a fairer, more equal society.

Over the last few months our participants (students, teachers and volunteers) have created this agenda for change:

1 – Affordable, good-quality, housing

2 – Living wages for all


3 – End to fuel poverty

4 – Free adult education for all (this means more community classes and more crèches)

5 – No discrimination

Our principle “tactic” is participatory education itself. Teachers and students use the classes to critically engage with important issues and to plan action that will help bring about the change they want. They then take action, evaluate it and go again if necessary. Learning is at the heart of the cycle.

The power we have is through organising. We have a small amount of organised money (as an organisation) and a relatively large number of organised people (around 400 participants, volunteers and staff in our organisation). We increase our power by working with other people and organisations who share our values.

To find out more: EFA London

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.


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