People’s Agenda profile 18: Students Against TTIP (SATTIP)

Students across the country are getting organised to take on the TTIP corporate takeover, SATTIP tell us in this eighteenth People's Agenda profile

April 28, 2015 · 2 min read

sattippeoples agenda ‘Together we are a powerful political voice. We believe we can influence change by involving more young people in political discussions and processes in order to make TTIP an issue to define the vote. Together we will protect our society from this corporate coup d’état.’

One of the most powerful and life-changing economic treaties – the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) – is underway. As Students against TTIP (SATTIP) UK, we are joining the Trans-Atlantic opposition movement, so that together, we can beat the deal.

As students, our agenda is primarily focused on protecting our right to define the society we are inheriting. We are opposed to the deal in its entirety, for it will water down indispensable regulations and erode hard won political gains such as our treasured labour rights and democratic accountability. Our movement is not a movement against free trade, but a preventative campaign against the damage that has been evidenced from unrestrained financial deregulation in the past.

Throughout history students have stepped up and used their collective voices to kick-start movements. The student network is vast; we have sway over the production of academic research and we have a space for critical and creative thought. Together we are a powerful political voice. We believe we can influence change by involving more young people in political discussions and processes in order to make TTIP an issue to define the vote. Together we will protect our society from this corporate coup d’état.

To find out more: Students Against TTIP Facebook 

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.



You can’t kill the spirit

A new book tells the story of the women who set up a pit camp to defend Houghton Main colliery against closure in 1992. It has been written by participants from Houghton and Sheffield Women Against Pit Closures: Caroline, Flis, Debbie and Marilyn

Copper mining in a climate emergency

Sebastian Ordoñez Muñoz reports on the red metal mining at the heart of a new wave of colonial expansion in Latin America

Scientists against the machine

Jane Shallice examines the history of radical research at the British Society for Social Responsibility in Science


Austerity starves our culture

Museums – and museum workers – have been hit hard by austerity policies and cuts. Clara Paillard outlines some of the key battlegrounds and considers what an alternative cultural policy might look like

Locking people up won’t help combat sexual violence

We need look beyond individual punishment to tackle a crisis which pervades the fabric of our society, argues Ann Russo

200 years from the Peterloo Massacre, we need a new movement for real democracy

Jon Narcross reflects on the legacy of the mass gathering for political representation, which was brutally shut down by the military and police.