People’s Agenda profile 18: Students Against TTIP (SATTIP)

Students across the country are getting organised to take on the TTIP corporate takeover, SATTIP tell us in this eighteenth People's Agenda profile

April 28, 2015 · 2 min read

sattippeoples agenda ‘Together we are a powerful political voice. We believe we can influence change by involving more young people in political discussions and processes in order to make TTIP an issue to define the vote. Together we will protect our society from this corporate coup d’état.’

One of the most powerful and life-changing economic treaties – the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) – is underway. As Students against TTIP (SATTIP) UK, we are joining the Trans-Atlantic opposition movement, so that together, we can beat the deal.

As students, our agenda is primarily focused on protecting our right to define the society we are inheriting. We are opposed to the deal in its entirety, for it will water down indispensable regulations and erode hard won political gains such as our treasured labour rights and democratic accountability. Our movement is not a movement against free trade, but a preventative campaign against the damage that has been evidenced from unrestrained financial deregulation in the past.

Throughout history students have stepped up and used their collective voices to kick-start movements. The student network is vast; we have sway over the production of academic research and we have a space for critical and creative thought. Together we are a powerful political voice. We believe we can influence change by involving more young people in political discussions and processes in order to make TTIP an issue to define the vote. Together we will protect our society from this corporate coup d’état.

To find out more: Students Against TTIP Facebook 

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