Peoples Agenda profile 17: Reclaim the Power

Direct Action group Reclaim the Power are targeting Didcot power station this May, they tell us in this seventeenth People's Agenda profile

April 28, 2015 · 2 min read

rtp peoples agenda ‘We are a national network that seeks to empower individuals by taking collective action against corporate interests.’

Reclaim the Power is a radical direct action network fighting for environmental, social and economic justice. We are a national network that seeks to empower individuals by taking collective action against corporate interests.

Typically, we occupy space near a selected target which provides an entry point for new people to get skilled up in action planning, autonomous organising and consensus.

Over the last few years, we have focused mainly on fracking. However this year we plan to target old coal and new gas at Didcot power station with a five day camp as part of a global call for action on corporate power ahead of the UN climate talks (COP21) in December 2015. The camp will run from Friday 29 May – Tuesday 2 June.

We’ll continue supporting frontline communities in their fight against fracking whilst also linking up with groups confronting everything from fuel poverty, NHS privatisation and the housing crisis.

To find out more: @nodashforgas

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.


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