People’s Agenda profile 15: Detention Action

Detention Action are calling time on unlimited detention, they tell us in our fifteenth People's Agenda profile

April 20, 2015 · 2 min read

detentionaction

peoples agenda ‘Defending the rights of migrants will never be a populist issue. Yet the pressure is growing on politicians standing in May to end the shameful practice of indefinite immigration detention.’

It’s time for a time limit on indefinite immigration detention.

Election day will determine whether undocumented migrants will continue to live under the threat of indefinite immigration detention. Without the right to vote, undocumented migrants are rarely at the top of politicians’ minds, yet the outcome of the election will affect even their most basic right to liberty.

Suspected terrorists can only be detained without charge for 45 days, yet refused asylum seekers and migrants are routinely locked up in high security detention centres for years. The UK is unique in Europe in having no time limit to immigration detention.


However, communities and networks around the country are mobilising to demand that politicians commit to putting a time limit on detention. People with experience of detention are leading a UK- wide movement of community groups, faith leaders and the Detention Forum network. And the message is being heard in Parliament: in March 2015, the first ever cross-party parliamentary inquiry into the detention system called for major reform.

Defending the rights of migrants will never be a populist issue. Yet the pressure is growing on politicians standing in May to end the shameful practice of indefinite immigration detention.

To find out more visit: @DetentionAction

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