People’s Agenda profile 15: Detention Action

Detention Action are calling time on unlimited detention, they tell us in our fifteenth People's Agenda profile

April 20, 2015 · 2 min read

detentionaction

peoples agenda ‘Defending the rights of migrants will never be a populist issue. Yet the pressure is growing on politicians standing in May to end the shameful practice of indefinite immigration detention.’

It’s time for a time limit on indefinite immigration detention.

Election day will determine whether undocumented migrants will continue to live under the threat of indefinite immigration detention. Without the right to vote, undocumented migrants are rarely at the top of politicians’ minds, yet the outcome of the election will affect even their most basic right to liberty.

Suspected terrorists can only be detained without charge for 45 days, yet refused asylum seekers and migrants are routinely locked up in high security detention centres for years. The UK is unique in Europe in having no time limit to immigration detention.

However, communities and networks around the country are mobilising to demand that politicians commit to putting a time limit on detention. People with experience of detention are leading a UK- wide movement of community groups, faith leaders and the Detention Forum network. And the message is being heard in Parliament: in March 2015, the first ever cross-party parliamentary inquiry into the detention system called for major reform.

Defending the rights of migrants will never be a populist issue. Yet the pressure is growing on politicians standing in May to end the shameful practice of indefinite immigration detention.

To find out more visit: @DetentionAction

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.

Join Red Pepper for our free event on 22 April in London- Beyond the Ballot Box: Ways we can Win.



You can’t kill the spirit

A new book tells the story of the women who set up a pit camp to defend Houghton Main colliery against closure in 1992. It has been written by participants from Houghton and Sheffield Women Against Pit Closures: Caroline, Flis, Debbie and Marilyn

Copper mining in a climate emergency

Sebastian Ordoñez Muñoz reports on the red metal mining at the heart of a new wave of colonial expansion in Latin America

Scientists against the machine

Jane Shallice examines the history of radical research at the British Society for Social Responsibility in Science


Austerity starves our culture

Museums – and museum workers – have been hit hard by austerity policies and cuts. Clara Paillard outlines some of the key battlegrounds and considers what an alternative cultural policy might look like

Locking people up won’t help combat sexual violence

We need look beyond individual punishment to tackle a crisis which pervades the fabric of our society, argues Ann Russo

200 years from the Peterloo Massacre, we need a new movement for real democracy

Jon Narcross reflects on the legacy of the mass gathering for political representation, which was brutally shut down by the military and police.