People’s Agenda profile 13: Campaign Against Arms Trade

Taking on the arms companies and governments responsible for the arms trade is all in a days work for Campaign Against Arms Trade, they tell us in this thirteenth People's Agenda profile

April 17, 2015 · 2 min read

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peoples agenda ‘Earlier this year, CAAT activists infiltrated a black tie dinner for arms dealers and named and shamed all of the MPs and arms companies in attendance. One of our members even managed to give the opening speech.’

The arms trade has a devastating impact on human rights and security, and severely damages economic development. We believe arms exports only reinforce a militaristic approach to international problems.

Arms companies don’t care who they sell their weapons to. We work on a number of fronts to put pressure on the government to end arms sales, particularly to human right abusing regimes like Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, and war zones.

We also challenge the arms trade’s attempts to legitimise itself by exposing its political lobbying and its sponsorship work with museums and public institutions.


Earlier this year, CAAT activists infiltrated a black tie dinner for arms dealers and named and shamed all of the MPs and arms companies in attendance. One of our members even managed to give the opening speech, which organisers definitely weren’t prepared for!

The arms trade enjoys an overwhelming level of financial and political support. We want to that support to be put into promoting social and environmental justice and industries like renewable energy. Shifting priorities would secure green jobs for the future and improve human security rather than threaten it.

To find out more visit: @CAATuk

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