Peoples Agenda profile 11: London Campaign Against Police and State Violence

LCAPSV explain how they are campaigning against the Met Police's criminalisation and abuse of black communities, in this eleventh profile in our People's Agenda series

April 15, 2015 · 2 min read

LCAPSVpeoples agenda ‘We work to collectivise victims and grievances, while the criminal justice system works to isolate us. Our strength is through community solidarity and aiding victims in legal, practical and emotional ways.’

London Campaign Against Police and State Violence (LCAPSV) is a group of mostly African and African Caribbean volunteers campaigning to make the Metropolitan Police end its abuses of power including the criminalisation of Black communities and endemic racist police violence.

We organise through non-hierarchical methods and elected officers. We work to collectivise victims and grievances, while the criminal justice system works to isolate us. Our strength is through community solidarity and aiding victims in legal, practical and emotional ways.

Our methods include: conducting stop and search workshops, organising legal advice for victims and running community groups to monitor repressive policing. We demand an overhaul of the police complaints system, replacing the discredited Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) with an investigatory police complaints board that has confidence from complainants of delivering genuine accountability to victims. We demand a public online register of police officer complaints to create greater transparency regarding complaint resolution. We demand an end to Section 60 stop and searches which do not require reasonable suspicion, and a complete end to the use of TASERS.

Justice should be accessible to all – we demand the full restoration of legal aid and reversal of access threshold changes.

To find out more visit: @LCAPSV

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.

Join Red Pepper for our free event on 22 April in London- Beyond the Ballot Box: Ways we can Win.


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