Peoples Agenda profile 10: Food Sovereignty Movement

Bringing together hundreds of groups working towards a democratic, sustainable and fair food system is the aim of the Food Sovereignty Network, as explained in this tenth profile in our People's Agenda series

April 14, 2015 · 2 min read

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peoples agenda ‘The food sovereignty movement in the UK has grown with hundreds of projects thriving across the UK. People who care for democratic, sustainable and fair food systems continue to grow in numbers and commitment.’

The movement members are realising the food sovereignty principles by focusing on food for people, building knowledge and skills, valuing food providers, localising foodsystems, working with nature and calling the government for adequate food and agriculture policies.

Following the successful first gathering of the food sovereignty movement in the UK, we will have the second national gathering on the 23-26 October. The gathering will be a great opportunity to:

· celebrate the strengths of the food sovereignty movement


· build a community of friends and networks

· be inclusive to people who have not yet engaged with food sovereignty

· agree a set of targets and policies to focus on as movement

· create representative, diverse and fair structures with which we can make decisions with as a movement

We welcome everyone who wants to work towards food sovereignty to join the movement and participate in our national gathering.

To find out more visit: Food Sovereignty Now

Red Pepper are running the People’s Agenda series in the run up to the General Election, demonstrating the breadth of exciting grassroots political activity in the UK.

Join Red Pepper for our free event on 22 April in London- Beyond the Ballot Box: Ways we can Win.


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