#NukeFilmFest

With a decision on replacing Trident due in 2016, WMD Awareness want to put on the UK's first film festival dedicated to exploring the impact of nuclear weapons

September 23, 2015 · 3 min read

wmdaWMD Awareness gives young adults in Britain a voice in the debate on nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction. We raise awareness of the facts and the politics surrounding these weapons, giving a fresh perspective on the debate by inspiring new audiences to stand up and have their say.

Over the last 2 years, we have been working with a passionate team of young volunteers who are now ready for their biggest challenge yet- putting on Britain’s first ever #NukeFilmFest to create a platform for debate about Trident.

Why now?

Next year the Conservative government will make their decision on the renewal of Trident, something which they have been long been in favour of. In a time of austerity, with the same government forcing cuts across the board, this could cost the taxpayer up to £100 billion over the next 30 years.

But with this years electoral success of the anti-nuclear Scottish National Party and the recent breakthrough of Jeremy Corbyn, who is also a supporter of nuclear disarmament, the political landscape has changed and our Ambassadors feel this is the time to get the word out!

Kelechi Okoye-Ahaneku, one of our Ambassadors, thinks a film festival would be a great place to provoke a debate about nukes.

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“Since getting involved with WMD Awareness, I have been part of our drive to raise awareness about nuclear weapons, to empower many people to think and act critically on the topic and to open the platform for debate and dialogue.”

“This response has been wonderful to witness and with your help we can host future events like the #NukeFilmFest where we aim to get the public involved in the debate.”

Another volunteer, Jethro, got involved with WMD Awareness because he was shocked at how little the average person knows about nuclear weapons in our country.

“The amount we spend on developing technology that, if used, would surely annihilate us all, is horrific, especially when you consider the harsh austerity measures are government are putting in place.“

We’ve only got until the end of October to reach our target of £3000 to put on #NukeFilmFest. To support it please go to our crowdshed page here.


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