Jeremy Hardy thinks… about greed

'In a market-driven society, it is a tribute to human decency that anyone behaves with any morals at all'

August 20, 2012 · 2 min read

Judging the rich is like judging the poor: if you’ve never been in their situation, you don’t know what you’d do if you were. But we like to think that the reason people have too much money is that they are morally flawed, and that the world of finance is so morally flawed that it’s almost impossible to understand. You’d have to be incredibly greedy or have a personality disorder even to find it interesting.

And we all like to hear of a big pot of unpaid tax that could be put to good use. All we have to do is lever it out of the hidden hands of the morally repugnant. Just as the left pretends that every penny of dodged tax would otherwise have been spent on hospitals (by George Osborne?), the right, I presume, has it earmarked for weapons and the bankrolling of the private sector.

Because conservatives especially bemoan immorality. They would have us believe that a creeping and recent venality is blighting capitalism’s good name. Greed and sharp practice have replaced philanthropy and propriety, goes the narrative.

In fairness to conservatives, they have a long tradition of economic intervention that stands in contrast to the economic‑liberal theory that everything sort of sorts itself out somehow. Tories are close enough to capitalism to know that it doesn’t actually work – not without a lot of help. They also know it has nothing to do with morals. In a market-driven society, it is a tribute to human decency that anyone behaves with any morals at all.

Furthermore, while it’s fun to point out that the worst tax-dodgers are always Tories, when Conservatives put financial gain before everything else, they are being entirely true to their principles.



Jeremy Hardy thinks… about Lexit

'The left case for Brexit was an interesting exercise, a bit like a Marxist review of The Very Hungry Caterpillar or one of those games where you work out whether it would be better to have no arms or no legs'

Jeremy Hardy thinks… about the language around Corbyn

'After winning an open contest with massive support, Corbyn has been accused of "seizing power"...'

Jeremy Hardy thinks… about Trident

'Nuclear weapons cannot be seen purely as a source of jobs'


Jeremy Hardy thinks… about solidarity

'Not many people would stand by and watch someone drown if they had the chance to rescue them, but that is what Europe’s governments are doing'

Jeremy Hardy thinks… about the Labour leadership

'The highlight began when it looked as though Corbyn could win, and continued thereafter'

Jeremy Hardy thinks… about Tony Blair

'No, it’s not time to rehabilitate Tony Blair.'