In Pictures: The World Transformed

Photos from The World Transformed festival in Liverpool, by David Walters

January 24, 2017 · 3 min read
The festival included not only talks but discussions workshop spaces and culture

Over four days at the end of September 2016, more than 4,000 people – including half of the shadow cabinet – came to the contemporary arts and community centre, Black-E, in Liverpool to take part in building a new, open, inclusive politics for the 21st century.

The World Transformed was different. Celebratory in spirit, it included not just politics but art, music, culture and community. Hosted by a coalition of grassroots groups and powered by Momentum, the festival gave a small flavour of a radical, positive vision for the future. There were packed meeting rooms at sessions ranging from ‘Building a progressive manifesto’ to ‘The future of work’, ‘Citizen journalism’ and ‘Democratic energy systems’, and activists huddled on floors to take part in the debates.

The buzz and energy created around The World Transformed suggests that politics is changing – now it’s up to all of us to make sure that continues. The World Transformed team is working on a series of projects designed to build on the success of the Liverpool event, but for now, we reflect on four days of debate and action in pictures.

Momentum Kids was launched with a varied children’s programme

 

 


 

 

Art was exhibited all around the venue. This is ‘Impossible Until Done’ by Sana Iqbal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Mason was joined by journalists from the Guardian, Jacobin and Novara to discuss building a radical media

 

Trade union activist Ewa Jasiewicz debated the future of the Labour Party as a social movement
Video footage was broadcast to a wider audience
Marina Prentoulis speaks with Jubilee Debt Campaign’s Sarah-Jayne Clifton about building a movement for economic justice

 


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