History


Rudolf Rocker: an anarchist ‘rabbi’ in London

12 October 2021 David J. Lobina rediscovers a forgotten but fascinating figure in London’s radical and Jewish history

The driver of dispossession

8 October 2021 Tina Ngata explains the social and legal legacies of a 15th-century Christian principle that paved the way for imperial violence in, and far beyond, New Zealand

Resisting India’s structural limits on suffrage

4 October 2021 Voter suppression and systematic exclusion cast a pall over the world's biggest 'democracy', writes Kavita Krishnan

Challenging the myths of empire: An interview with Priyamvada Gopal

8 September 2021 The professor of postcolonial studies at the University of Cambridge talks to K Biswas about Britain's sentimental attachment to its imperial past, via selective amnesia and deliberate obfuscation

The depths of injustice

5 September 2021 Jay V Haigler is a Diving With a Purpose (DWP) scientific diver and master instructor. Here he explains the power of educating through storytelling

The blood never dries

19 August 2021 While our government wants us to step back and forget what we know about the violence of Britain’s imperial state, Richard Gott says it’s time for a much deeper reckoning

Drawing a line in Afghanistan

5 August 2021 The legacy of colonialism is still very real along borders arbitrarily drawn by the British and brutally contested to this day, writes Suchitra Vijayan

The Socialist Olympics of 1936

23 July 2021 Radical workers’ sporting organisations and the 1936 People’s Olympiad illustrate the role of sport in fighting oppression, writes Uma Arruga i López.

Power on the picket line: remembering the Burnsall Strike

8 July 2021 Almost 30 years on, Sarbjit Johal recalls supporting the strike, which consisted of mostly Punjabi women workers

Old advertisement featuring happy housewives with vaccuum cleaners and one sad housewife with dustpan and brush

Covid and the household economy crisis

16 June 2021 Even before the pandemic, the squeeze on household time and income had reached crisis point. Ursula Huws examines social reproduction in the digital age

The Firm and its long-lasting grip

12 June 2021 Laura Clancy examines the history of the Crown, its role in empire and its continuing functional and ideological purpose today

Review – Angela Carter’s ‘Provincial Bohemia’

13 May 2021 Despite some omissions, Stephen E Hunt's examination of radical novelist Angela Carter's time in Bristol and Bath provides a useful lens to analyse the countercultural history of the two cities, argues Sue Tate.

Unionists of the left

12 April 2021 Sophie Long uncovers the progressive unionism overshadowed by Northern Ireland's right-wing mainstream

The bastard state

10 April 2021 A hundred years on from partition, Pádraig Ó Meiscill diagnoses the many ills of past and present Northern Ireland

From the Commune to communalism

18 March 2021 March–May 2021 marks 150 years since the Paris Commune. Mathijs van de Sande and Gaard Kets explore its legacy and enduring relevance for today’s left

A street sign in Watford marks Colonial Way leading to Rhodes Way, Imperial Way and Clive Way

Statues, street names, and contested memory

10 February 2021 Proudly 'anti-woke' posturing is just the latest government attempt to memorialise white supremacy. Meghan Tinsley reports on the politics of commemoration

Review – Regicide or Revolution? What petitioners wanted, September 1648 – February 1649 by Nora Carlin

29 November 2020 Norah Carlin's analysis of the Levellers' petitions reaffirms the radical nature of the English revolution, argues John Rees.

Killing the Northern Ireland peace process

5 November 2020 Forget Brexit, argues Odrán Waldron, the British and Irish governments are undermining the peace process by trying to ignore their legacies in the North.

From dole to gold

24 August 2020 Today’s welfare system is notoriously punitive, but in the 1980s it provided the basis of future Olympic success, argues Peter Goulding

Democracy in focus: a post-austerity state

8 January 2020 The UK needs a people’s constitution to defend rights and enable us to fulfil our potential, writes Hilary Wainwright

Radical Roots – Corbyn and the Tradition of English Radicalism

14 October 2019 The ideas underpinning Corbynism are deeply embedded in the English radical tradition. Reclaiming this tradition can play a key part in reinvigorating our ambitions for the future. By MICHAEL CALDERBANK with HILARY WAINWRIGHT

Whose history? Why the People’s History Museum is vital

5 July 2019 In recent months, high-profile figures have claimed museums should be ‘neutral’ spaces. Thank goodness, then, for the People’s History Museum, writes Danielle Child

Rewriting history: museums and ‘neutrality’

5 July 2019 Museums are socially vital precisely because of their political nature, says Siobhan McGuirk

Marx’s Capital at 150: an invitation to history

30 September 2017 Radhika Desai says Capital by Karl Marx is still an essential read on the 150th anniversary of its publication

Power Games: A Political History

5 December 2016 Malcolm Maclean reviews Jules Boykoff's Power Games: A Political History

The abolition of Art History A-Level will exacerbate social inequality

29 November 2016 This is a massive blow to the rights of ordinary kids to have the same opportunities as their more privileged peers. Danielle Child reports.

The myth of the 1970s

23 October 2014 In the 1970s, they say, the dead lay unburied, greedy unions held the country to ransom and a divided country was impossible to govern, John Medhurst asks: was it really so bad?

Brushing history against the grain

31 May 2013 We can’t decipher the present without examining its foundations in the battles of the past, writes Mike Marqusee

Beyond the Fragments is more than history

21 April 2013 The book was part of challenging the left's methods of organisation, writes Alice Robson - and that struggle continues today as it is republished



Want to try Red Pepper before you take out a subscription? Sign up to our newsletter and read Issue 231 for free.